News Business Sports Entertainment Life Obituaries Opinion
Jobs Homes Cars Classifieds Shopping
Local Bloggers Cheap Tech Eco-Confessions Faceoff Furst Draft Heard on the Street Med City Movie Guy Pulse on Health Political Party

Search PB Blogs

Loading

Categories

« Rochester resident compares shoveling ordinance to ancient British tyranny | Main | Racist comment about stabbing coverage? »

02/28/2012

Reader: It's time for everyone in the word to stop using gasoline for a few days

Images-1A Rochester native, who now lives in St. Paul, sent me the following email suggesting an international gas holiday as a way of helping to bring down high gasoline prices and showing members of OPEC and other oil-producing countries that we mean business.

I think it's a great idea, but I'm way to busy to organize it. Pluse, I don't have any connections in Portugal or Eritrea. Anyone else interested in taking this on?

Dear  Editor,

I think it is time for every country in the world to declare a gasoline
holiday.
Every person that can get by without a car or truck do just that.
Let those greedy people who control the oil supply of the world dump  their
excess wherever they can find a place to dump it; in the ocean, in the
desert, wherever.

I really feel their prices will come down after a few days of the  Gasoline
holiday.

Yours truly,
N C Horton Sr.

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Somewhere there is a word for an idea that sounds good but is just plain silly. Maybe we should call is a "horton"...

There are many reasons this is a horton, but to list one: on the day after the boycott, demand for gas remains the same, except now its even greater in the short term, so everyone lines up and gets the gas they need. The amount they need being unpredictable, this could lead to shortages, which leads to....even HIGHER prices. You haven't changed anything except to delay a purchase, so the price doesn't change.

The idea is a great one! I guess the next step on from that is to take a permanent holiday and move to electric and/or LPG. I fear, however, that's still a long, long way off.

I observe the Sabbath by doing REST and often SILENCE, too.
Easy not to buy or sell and often to walk, not drive..
If more places closed on Sundays (as they used to do) it would be a quieter, friendlier ambience.
No buying or using gas on Sundays should make a dent...

Barb,
not buying gas on Sundays is not going to make any difference - you'd just buy it on Saturday or Monday instead.
If we really wanted to make a difference, American drivers would have to make an effort to CONSERVE gas - but that, apparently, is just too darn hard to do...

Stephan J., I believe that there will be a ripple effect...some filling stations will close on Sundays (or take turns being open) to save money.... people will enjoy the quiet... not driving anywhere will restore the old-fashioned custom of family dinners, neighborhood interaction... and thus conserve as well.
I conserve by driving a Geo and walking or using public transportation often... it's an attitude "habit."

Barb, there are some people, unlike you, that the weekend is their only day they have off to do stuff like go shopping or visit friends and family. Not buying gas one day a week isn't going to make a dent in oil consumption. The slack will just be made up in other countries. The filling stations that close on Sundays will soon find themselves just that-Closed up for good.

Barb, if places do close on Sunday to go back to the good 'ol days you envision, what about the people that work at those places? Would you take pleasure in knowing that those people are out of work for a day, taking away money that would go to buy food or pay other essential bills?

Great comments all - personally I think the principle of the idea is sound and I'm with Automatic Driving in that the move to sustainable transport is where it's at. On that note, keep your eyes on China - a lot seems to be happening there re eco tech!

The comments to this entry are closed.