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10/27/2011

Health education? Mayo Clinic open house.... #RochMN

The Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences plans an open house for prospective students.

The school's dean, faculty and staff are scheduled to attend.

The school offers 96 programs in 57 health-science fields. Students from various fields will be available to talk about the degree program you're interested in.

Time: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Date: Tuesday, November 1 (2011)

Location: Mayo Clinic Siebens Building, first floor, 100 Second Av. S.W. in Rochester. Go to the historic, amber-colored Plummer Building, stand between the Plummer Building and the Mayo Building (with the dolphin fountain behind you) and the Siebens Building is the one to the left of Plummer.

Plummer Building at Mayo Clinic
[The Mayo Clinic Plummer Building. Photo by Jeff Hansel. Copyright.]

With a degree from the school, you can focus on:
Athletic Training
Audiology
Cardiac Electrophysiology
Cardiovascular Invasive Specialist
Cardiovascular Perfusionist
Central Service Technician
Child Life Specialist
Clinical Laboratory Sciences
Clinical Neurophysiology Technology
Clinical Pastoral Education
Clinical Research
Cytogenetic Technology
Cytotechnology
Diabetes Intensive Training
Dietetics
Echocardiography
Endoscopy Nurse
Endoscopy Technician
Exercise Science
Genetic Counseling
Health Information Management
Hemodialysis Patient Care Technician
Histology Technician
Mind Body Medicine
Molecular Genetics Technology
Nuclear Medicine Technology
Nurse Anesthesia
Nurse Midwife
Nurse Practitioner
Nursing Clinical Education
Occupational Therapy
Pathologists' Assistant
Perioperative Nurse
Pharmacy
Phlebotomy Technician
Physical Therapy
Physician Assistant
Radiation Therapy
Radiography
Recreational Therapy
Respiratory Care
Social Work
Sonography
Speech Pathology
Surgical Technology
Wellness Coaching

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

10/26/2011

CORRECTION CHS Stop Bullying kickoff 6:30 p.m. Thursday.... #RochMN

My apologies for entering the wrong time previously. Please note the kickoff is at 6:30 p.m. tonight (Thursday, 10/27/11)

A community-wide Stop Bullying campaign kickoff is scheduled for Thursday (October 27, 2011).

Time: 6:30 p.m.

Location: Century High School

To register: Call Child Care Resource & Referral, 507-287-2020 ext. 1321

"Parents will learn to recognize signs of bullying and address it, and students will learn how to advocate for themselves and be an ally to bullying victims," says an announcement from the Diversity Council in Rochester. "Help us save our youth."

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

Gluten-free galas... #RochMN

Hy-Vee has been telling shoppers about "Gluten-free Galas" coming up:

Saturday, November 5, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (2011) at Hy-Vee Barlow, 1315 6th Street N.W. here in Rochester, Minnesota.

Saturday, November 19, 1 to 3 p.m. at Hy-Vee south, 500 Crossroads Drive S.W. in Rochester.

The event includes "tasting and recipes for all."

Why is gluten-free food preparation important?

A surprising number of people can not tolerate gluten in their diets.

Symptoms of celiac disease, which requires a gluten-free diet, include intermittent diarrhea, abdominal pain and bloating, says MayoClinic.com. Other symptoms can include irritability, anemia, upset stomach, joint pain, muscle cramps, skin rash, mouth sores, dental disorders and tingling in the legs and feet. Untreated celiac disease can lead to weight loss, weakness, foul-smelling or gray stools that may be fatty or oily, stunted growth in children and osteoporosis.

The Mayo website says "gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye."

"Gluten causes inflammation in the small intestines of people with celiac disease. Eating a gluten-free diet helps people with celiac disease control their signs and symptoms and prevent complications," the clinic writes.

A variety of foods, such as beer and pasta and salad dressing contain gluten. So, according to Mayo, do products like lipstick and toothpaste. Many business now offer gluten-free foods. 

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

10/25/2011

Dr. Eric Grigsby Mayo Clinic Alumni Association president... #RochMN

Dr. Eric Grigsby has been elected president of the Mayo Clinic Alumni Association.

According to Mayo Clinic, Grigsby was elected at the group's biennial continuing education meeting in Jacksonville, Florida, where Mayo has a campus.

Mayo's national headquarters is here in Rochester, Minnesota.

The clinic's announcement notes that Grigsby is "founding medical director of the Napa Pain Institute, and chief executive officer of Neurovations, a Napa company specializing in pain and neuroscience research and clinical education."

According to the clinic, the Alumni Association board members are physicians and scientists who trained at Mayo.

Grigsby "led the Mayo Clinic Alumni Association Board in voting unanimously to establish the Mayo International Humanitarian Endowment to support programs that provide care to underserved patient populations around the world. Dr. Grigsby and his wife, Mary Rocca, also operate their foundation, HealthRoots, which provides care to underserved groups, most recently in Malawi, East Africa."

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

Can your team do a White Earth medical needs assessment...?

The Minnesota Department of Health has published a request for proposals "for the purpose of conducting a needs assessment for a health clinic or other health care needs of the Tribal Population in the Twin Cities metropolitan area, with a focus and emphasis on White Earth Nation members."

The successful applicants for the contract will be required to "report to the Legislature documenting the results of the assessment and providing recommendation."

To get a copy of the request for proposal, write:
Debra Jahnke
Office of Rural Health and Primary Care
Minnesota Department of Health
85 E. 7th Place, Suite 220
St. Paul, MN 55105
651-201-3845
[email protected]

You must request a copy of the request for proposals by November 7, 2011. 

To qualify, you must respond by November 16, 2011 (late responses will not be considered).

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

10/24/2011

Tower Investments wrestling with city...

“We don’t just plop down and bring people in from out of state. We hire local people, and we’ll continue to very aggressively invest…,” said Tower Investments Senior Vice President Alex Marks. 

But Marks wasn't talking to the Post-Bulletin about his plan for the planned Elk Run biobusiness park in Pine Island. Rather, this quote comes from a Tennessean newspaper article about the after-effects of a quarrel and resulting court case in Nashville.

The Marks family (which includes Alex Marks, his dad and siblings) has "become ensnarled in an eminent domain battle with Metro government over land it purchased in 2007 that the city wanted for a new convention center. The city offered Tower $14.8 million, which is roughly $20,000 more than Tower paid for it three years earlier. But a Circuit Court jury decided the land was worth more than twice that. The Metro Development and Housing Agency has appealed," Tennessean reporter Bobby Allyn writes.

His article is headlined "Developer's dreams may hinge on making up with Nashville officials."

Likewise, the Great Recession and Tower's failure to actually build anything in Pine Island has left locals here in Minnesota miffed about the lengthy development process.

Capital investment firm Burrill & Company recently announced closing multi-million-dollar capital funds in excess of $1 billion from which some Elk Run investments might be made if the right biotechs come along. Biotechs accepting investment from those funds will be encouraged to locate at Pine Island's Elk Run.

Tower Investment also says Burrill & Company is raising a separate $1 billion fund. If a biotech accepts investment from that fund, it will be required as part of the deal to set up business at Elk Run.

Keep in mind, though, that information coming from Tower about Burrill plans is a little, well, uncertain.

Burrill and Company CEO G. Stephen Burrill emphasized to the Post-Bulletin in August that Tower's local contract representative "Geoff Griffin does not speak for Burrill & Company."

"Skeptics" in Tennessee sound much like Minnesota critics of Tower's development proposals.

Allyn writes that "skeptics say the Marks family flies under the radar because they haven’t achieved much here — at least not so far."

But "we all look for opportunities and, depending what the deal is, we divide and conquer," Allyn quotes Marks as saying.

Perhaps that sounds familiar too.

Development projects take time. Pine Island City Administrator Abraham Algadi, for example, has pointed to the Walgreens in central Rochester, Minnesota as an example of a project that took years to come to fruition. 

And, early on, Tower officials had suggested that the whole biopark would not somehow magically spring from the ground that first year but would rather take 20 years to become a biotech powerhouse.

That's not much comfort to critics, though, who last year (and the year before — and the year before) were promised a first biotech building or buildings.

So far, the only structure on the Elk Run site is geologic. 

Of course, should construction begin and companies start opening, Elk Run's potential might become a little less foggy — especially since construction of the Elk Run interchange on U.S. 52 is underway.

One doesn't have to look far to see development projects that were gee-whiz when announced but floundered over the ensuing years. But Tower has, indeed, invested a couple of million dollars for water and sewer infrastructure in Pine Island. That makes the community construction-ready as the nation slowly works its way out of the after-effects of the recession.

So the potential for a construction boom exists. The question is, will Tower and Burrill lead that effort?

Elk Run 8065
[A "space available" sign that has graced the planned Elk Run site for three years. Photo by Jeff Hansel. Copyright.]

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

Exercise boosting anti-flu vaccine effect....?

Researchers at Iowa State University are studying whether exercise within a short period of getting vaccinated against influenza boosts the body's immune response.

"The researchers earlier conducted a pilot study of 16 college students, which found that subjects who rode a stationary bicycle for 90 minutes shortly after receiving their H1N1 flu vaccine had nearly doubled the antibody response to the vaccine as compared to subjects who had remained sedentary for the same 90-minute period," says a research description from ISU. "the researchers presented their findings at the American Association of Immunology (Autumn Immunology) Conference last November."

This year, they're studying the issue in about 50 older adults, whose bodies aren't as strong as younger folks. Obese individuals' immune response isn't as good as that of people who aren't abuse, according to Iowa State.

75 isu campanile jeff hansel
[The Iowa State University carillon in Ames, Iowa. Photo by Jeff Hansel. Copyright.]

The researchers, in addition to studying immunity boosts via exercise in the elderly, want to see if they can "rescue" the immune system of obese individuals who exercise after getting vaccinated.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

10/23/2011

Support for caregivers of people with cancer... #RochMN

Are you taking care of a loved one who is living with cancer? Do you make sure you are also taking care of yourself well?

The Family Caregiver Support Group for caregivers of individuals with cancer meets on the second Wednesday and third Monday each month.

Time: 7 to 8 p.m.

Date: The next meetings will be Nov. 9 and 21

Location: The Sandra J. Schulze American Cancer Society Hope Lodge, 411 Second Street N.W. in Rochester

Need more information? Call Elder Network at 285-5272.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

Elder Network needs volunteers... #RochMN

Elder Network in Rochester is in need of area volunteers.

"Peer Support volunteers are people 55 years or better who undergo training to make weekly home visits to support older adults through the changes, adjustments and stresses that accompany later life," says an announcement. "Transportation volunteers help seniors who cannot drive make it to their medical appointments."

Also, "Friendly Visitor" volunteers spend about one or two hours a week "visiting with a senior who has limited social contacts and is often eager for someone to talk to or to listen to."

Another option is "Respite Care" volunteers. They offer companionship to an elderly person, "allowing that person’s caregiver time to attend a support group, grocery shop, relax, run needed errands, or just take a break from the duties of care giving."

Stewartville and Eyota in particular need volunteers, along with Rochester.

Can you offer a little time? Call Elder Network at 285-5272.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

10/22/2011

Care plans for aging parents....

A free "Web conference" is scheduled this week to help family caregivers create an "effective care plan for aging parents."

The National Private Duty Association (NPDA) is offering the online computer conference called "Creating a Care Plan for Your Parents."

Date: Thursday, November 3 (2011).

Time: 7 p.m.

Cost: Free

"The live and interactive program will provide advice on how family caregivers can work with care professionals to develop an effective plan of care for a loved one," says an announcement. "Caregivers will learn how to identify key issues and problems, locate needed experts, and outline expected outcomes to ensure that a parent is cared for in the best manner possible." 

Scheduled topics include
• Setting up a successful plan.
• Plan components.
• Implementation  of care.
• Managing expectations.
• Care evolution.
• Warning signs.

Pre-registration is required at www.privatedutyhomecare.org.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel