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« August 2011 | Main | October 2011 »

44 posts from September 2011

09/30/2011

October Winona Health events....

 

Winona Health in Winona, Minnesota has a plethora of events scheduled for the coming month of October. Here's just a sampling:

Watkins Manor Assisted Living Free Music Mondays
Monday October 3 (2011)
Time: 1 to 4 p.m.
Location: Watkins Manor Great Hall, 175 E. Wabasha St., Winona (music starts at 2:30). Tours available of Watkins Manor assisted living before and after.

• All About Baby
Tuesday, October 4
Time: 12 to 1:30 pm
Location: Winona Health Center for Women’s Health, 3rd floor Winona Clinic, 859 Mankato Avenue. It's a weekly drop-in group for parents to weigh their baby, ask questions and meet other parents. New parents and expecting parents are welcome too (457-7701).

Diabetes Prevention Program
Tuesday October 4
Time: 6:30 to 7:30 pm
Location: Winona Clinic, 2nd Floor Conference Room, 859 Mankato Avenue., Winona
Small Steps, Big Rewards. Your Game Plan for managing health risks to prevent
Type 2 Diabetes. Series of four classes on Tuesday evenings.
Cost: $50 (457-7670)

Lake Winona Manor Fall Fireworks
Tuesday October 4
Time: 7  to 8 p.m.
Location: Winona Health campus, 855 Mankato Avenue in Winona, Lake Winona Manor, North parking lot overlooking lake. Fireworks for Lake Winona Manor residents and their families. All are welcome.

Free Depression Screening
Thursday Oct 6
Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Location: Winona Health campus, Parkview Office Building 2nd floor, Suite 200, 825 Mankato Venue in Winona.
Winona Health’s Psychiatric and Counseling Services staff is providing free, confidential depression screening. Common symptoms of depression include: A persistent feeling of sadness; loss of pleasure in usually enjoyable activities; feelings of hopelessness, helplessness and worthlessness; changes in sleep patterns and appetite; loss of energy; restlessness; thoughts of death or suicide. No appointment is necessary for this free and confidential screening. The screening will take approximately 30 minutes. For more information, contact Psychiatric & Counseling Services (454-2606).

(Source: Winona Health)

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

Congratulations Gold Cross Ambulance.... #RochMN

Mayo Clinic's Gold Cross Ambulance, part of Mayo Medical Transport, has accredited again by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems.

"Gold Cross first received accreditation in 2008 and is currently the only ground ambulance service in Minnesota and Wisconsin with this designation," says an announcement.

The accreditation review took seven months and analyzed the "program’s policies and procedures on outreach and education, dispatch, clinical care, quality assurance, and safety." It also included a site visit by certified surveyors, checking to see whether the CAMTS standards are met

A crew recently visited my own home recently for diabetes-related health problems. The crew members were kind, full of smiles and allowed me to make decisions about how to proceed.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

09/29/2011

Can you locate abuser on the run...?

The Dodge County Sheriff's Office continues to hunt for Dale Harry Batt, who, according to the sheriff's office was "convicted in March of 2000 for 3rd Degree Felony Assault causing Substantial Bodily Harm to his (now-former) wife."

He's got lots of connections in southeast Minnesota, so maybe you know him, have heard something about him or have an idea where he might be.

The Sheriff's Office says Batt "was sentenced to 5 years in prison and granted a stay of imposition as long as he successfully completed probation and treatment."

Batt has connections to Leroy, Rochester, the Twin Cities, Cass Lake in Minnesota and Dickinson, North Dakota.

Authorities say you should NOT approach Batt. Instead, call the sheriff's office at 507-635-6200 or email information to Investigator Scott Rose at scott.rose@co.dodge.mn.us.

Rose said there's no new information to report in the search.

But, he said, "I would love to find Dale Batt!"

Batt, pictured below, is wanted for a variety of charges, including aggravated assault and violation of a felony warrant after he "was beyond sadistic in the ways he abused his (former wife whom he) repeatedly threatened to kill," according to America's Most Wanted.

Clip_image004_000 Clip_image006_000 Clip_image008_000

[Images of Batt from Dodge County Sheriff's Office website.]

Rose also said he'd like to apprehend Oscar Michael Trevino, who's wanted for absconding from supervision, failing to register as a sex offender and other charges. 

Wanted1
[Photo of Trevino from Dodge County Sheriff's Office website.]

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

Workshop to help senior citizens live better... #RochMN

A free workshop to help you put the "life" back in life is coming from the S.E. Minnesota Area Agency on Aging.

Location: The Northrop, room 308, in Rochester.

Dates: Tuesdays

Times: From 9:30am – 11:30am, October 11th – November 15th, 201. 

"The Living Well With Chronic Conditions Workshop is for adults 60+ with diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, anxiety, or any other ongoing health condition," says an announcement. "People who attend the workshop say they get relief from their pain and fatigue, enjoy more energy to do the things that matter, feel calmer, and are more confident about their life."

Information will focus on "learning how to eat well, relax, communicate about your health, manage your medications, and control your pain, you can take charge of your life and feel better."

For information or to register, call 328-4000.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

09/28/2011

Heritage Days at Mayo Clinic.... #RochMN

Mayo Clinic has announced its annual "Heritage Days" celebration.

"Everyone is welcome to join in this weeklong event. This year’s theme, 'Growing Our Heritage,'  focuses on nurturing Mayo’s heritage, culture and values to support its mission to serve the needs of each patient," says an announcement from the clinic.

Dates: October 3 through 7 (2011)

The celebration is designed for staff, volunteers and retirees.

"A variety of Heritage Days events will take place across the Rochester campus throughout the week," the announcement says.

Events include:

• Concerts and dance performance from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at several locations.

Commemorative displays featuring Mayo Clinic’s notable anniversaries in Mathews Grand Lobby in the Mayo Building, 200 1st Street S.W.

Two vintage automobiles, a 1931 “Waldorf” Pierce-Arrow and a 1914 Model T Speedster, will be on display at Annenberg Plaza between the Plummer and Mayo buildings. The “Waldorf” Pierce-Arrow is restored to showroom quality and includes its original interior and top. The car was featured at the New York Auto Show and displayed in the lobby of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. The Model T Speedster is a classic speedster, restored to its original condition. Henry Ford, who developed the Model T, was a friend of Dr. William J. Mayo. This car rolled off the assembly line in 1914, the same year that Mayo’s first building designed for the integrated group practice of medicine opened on the site of what is today the Siebens Building.

"Stop by to get a glimpse of these rare cars and learn how Mayo Clinic 'got rolling' in the early years before World War I," the clinic announcement says. "Both vehicles are owned by Fred and Ramona Trachsel of Rochester and they are loaning them for display Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m."

For more details about the public events , go to http://www.mayoclinic.org/heritage-days-rst/.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

What Mayo Medical School Arizona means for Native Americans...

The announcement Tuesday afternoon that Mayo Clinic plans a new Mayo Medical School—Arizona Campus should bring awareness that there are very few Native American physicians.

Part of the new school's educational program requires treating patients during the third year of medical school at clinics in under-served areas.

Dr. Keith Lindor, Mayo Medical School dean, said diverse students impact each other's values and help each other prepare to take care of diverse patients. He said Mayo has worked to encourage applications from Native Americans and will continue to do so. In Arizona, many rural populations include Native Americans and perhaps there are local residents who would like to enter the field of medicine in order to provide health care in their home communities.

The location in the Southwest of the new branch of Mayo Medical School might make it more attractive to Native Americans who live in the region, Lindor said.

Mayo's medical education is highly competitive.

Lindor said the 42 open "regular" M.D. degree program slots in Rochester this year attracted 4,200 applications.

Think of that.

But I'm aware that if you are committed and have unusual qualifications, such as life experience, it's taken into account in addition to grades, public service, etc.

So why not give the application process a whirl? The first Arizona class will start, at the earliest, in 2014.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

09/27/2011

Clinic announces Mayo Medical School—Arizona Campus... #RochMN

Mayo Clinic officials in Arizona have announced the pending opening of a new Mayo Medical School—Arizona Campus in collaboration with Arizona State University in Phoenix.

The news comes after eight years of joint efforts between ASU and Mayo in Arizona, including a dual law/medicine degree, a joint nursing program and a variety research collaborations.

Mayo Medical School sign  Mayo Clinic
[Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minnesota. Photo by Jeff Hansel. Copyright.]

But the new campus will also come with a new focus — a master's degree in the science of health-care delivery.

"Both (Mayo and ASU) bring unique leadership qualities and creative energy and enthusiasm for learning and innovation, which has provided a solid foundation for the collaborative endeavors mutually undertaken," said Mayo spokeswoman Kelley Luckstein.

Luckstein explained that success of the collaboration with ASU "led to the decision by Mayo Clinic’s Board of Governors to establish the first branch extension of Mayo Medical School."

The Arizona campus will include "an embedded degree program in the science of health care delivery, the first of its kind in the nation," according to Luckstein. The collaboration, she said, "will redefine the health care workforce of the future while providing an important source of future staff and health care leaders to serve the needs of patients."

For details about topics the medical students will study, tuition and funding for the new campus, which will double Mayo Medical School's total enrollment, read PostBulletin.com today and the print edition Wednesday (Sept. 28, 2011).

Mayo Medical School's website says it trains students to be:
• humane health care leaders, both in clinical practice and in the policy arena
• expert, ethical healers who have unassailable integrity
• generous and sensitive world citizens serving the public good across cultural boundaries
• lifelong learners committed to growth
• dual-degree professionals who obtain multiple advanced degrees, such as medicine and law, or medicine and public health, as a means of interacting more effectively in shaping public health care policy and regulation
• artful collaborators who seek out multiple points of view and are skilled at negotiating synthesis as they work

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

Worksite wellness in Rochester, Minnesota.... #RochMN

The 3rd annual Worksite Wellness Conference and Expo is scheduled for Wednesday (September 28, 2011) in Rochester.

Time: Starting at 8 a.m. and lasting through the day.

Location: Grand Ballroom in the Civic Center, 30 Civic Center Drive S.E., Rochester

"The conference focuses on how worksites can improve employees’ health through the implementation of wellness strategies," says an announcement from Olsted County Public Health. "Participants will learn best practices from worksite wellness leaders, network with area wellness professionals, and bring innovative ideas back to their worksites."

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

A mind's eye, a vision exposed....

Researchers at the University of California at Berkeley in California have come tantalizingly close to displaying an image of what the brain sees, based on analyses of brain activity.

The scientists studied brain activity and produced pictures from that activity. Shockingly (in my view) brain activity from a person who saw a photograph of Steve Martin produced enough information for researchers to produce a facsimile that, while blurry and incomplete, can easily be recognized as a human form.

The next step, obviously, is to fine-tune the technique so that researchers can more-closely mimic what the brain registers.

On one hand, this research is really cool.

On the other hand, I can imagine abuses.

I can also imagine many potential uses. Walk through the airport, for instance and the "brain scanner" would know if someone is thinking about terrorism. Head to the courthouse and the scanner might display a person's memory of the alleged crime — perhaps images only the murderer could have seen.

Take a sleep test and the scanner would tell you what you dreamt while you were asleep. Go to divorce court and tell the truth — or you get busted.

Anyone with imagination, of course, will imagine far scarier scenarios. For example, you're zooming along the highway and a brain scanner detects that your mind has strayed from the task at hand — zap! Electrified reminders to pay attention to the pavement.

Or, you walk into the classroom for your final exam — and the scanner gives you a score, based on the level of what your brain scan shows you remember, and the likelihood you'll remember the information a year from now.

Pass a scanner at the doctor's office and, in the future, maybe it'll tell you your thoughts aren't forming properly. Diagnosis dementia. 

So I don't know how much I like the idea of a brain scanner looking into our minds. But I still find it fascinating.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

09/26/2011

U of M coach Jerry Kill seeking Mayo Clinic treatment.... #RochMN

University of Minnesota Golden Gophers football coach Jerry Kill is seeking treatment at Mayo Clinic here in Rochester, Minnesota after seizures have become numerous enough to disrupt his life.

Kill is a seasoned and accomplished coach, having served in coaching positions previously in Pittsburg, Kansas, at Webb City (Missouri) High School, at Saginaw Valley State in Michigan, at Emporia State in Kansas and at both Southern Illinois and Northern Illinois, according to Golden Gophers Football.

Living with a seizure disorder obviously doesn't mean you will be prevented from having a distinguished career. Kill has proven that. But keep in mind that any chronic illness — such as epilepsy, diabetes, allergies or asthma — does not disappear just because someone is receiving treatment.

MayoClinic.com has this advice if someone near you has a seizure:
• Call for medical help.
• Gently roll the person onto one side and put something soft under his or her head.
• Loosen tight neckwear.
• Don't put anything in the mouth — the tongue can't be swallowed and objects placed in the mouth can be bitten or inhaled.
• Don't try to restrain the person.
• Look for a medical alert bracelet, which may indicate an emergency contact person and other information.
• Note how long the seizure lasts.
A grand mal seizure lasting more than five minutes, or immediately followed by a second seizure, should be considered a medical emergency in most people. If this happens, emergency care should be sought as quickly as possible.

I am surprised Mayo doesn't suggest offering reassuring words, as I have found that to be helpful personally when helping someone with a seizure.

You can say in a calm, steady, reassuring voice that help is on the way and that you won't leave until help arrives. Keep in mind, too, that a person having a seizure might remember some of what is said by others during the seizure. 

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel