News Business Sports Entertainment Life Obituaries Opinion
Jobs Homes Cars Classifieds Shopping
Local Bloggers Cheap Tech Eco-Confessions Faceoff Furst Draft Heard on the Street Med City Movie Guy Pulse on Health Political Party

Search PB Blogs

Loading

Categories

« April 2011 | Main | June 2011 »

57 posts from May 2011

05/31/2011

Mayo Clinic's CEO: 200 million patients yearly.... #RochMN

Make sure to pick up a copy of Rochester Magazine as soon as you see one. They're going to fly off the shelves.

They're chock full of predictions for the future of Rochester, Minnesota — and some of the predictions, built upon information already made public — will get you thinking that there are local folks with big plans.

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy has told the Post-Bulletin publication that Mayo expects to create "a meaningful interaction with 200 million patients and people each year" by the year 2020.

200 million people

That's 2,000 times the population of Rochester seen by Mayo Clinic physicians, calling a Mayo nurse, getting an econsult with a specialist, getting a rare lab test through Mayo Medical Laboratories, stopping by the Mayo Clinic Gateway at the Mall of America, getting proton pencil-beam therapy in Rochester or interacting online from Dubai.

It's tough to adequately explain why Mayo's outreach statewide, nationally and internationally actually means more people will come here to Rochester rather than fewer. But I put it to you this way:

If Mayo maintains Rochester, Phoenix, Arizona and Jacksonville, Florida as destination medical centers for patients who need experts in serious, relatively rare medical conditions, and Mayo builds its patient base to 200 million people, only a tiny, tiny fraction of those patients coming to Rochester for specialty care represent a huge increase in patient flow here.

1/10 of 1 percent is 200,000 people — twice Rochester's population — so there's plenty of room for growth in the number of patients served directly in Rochester, job growth and patient service.

I dare you to run out now and get a copy of Rochester Magazine so you can be the one creating buzz in your office — there's so many fascinating predictions filling the issue that there will plenty to talk about!

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

#RochMN goose advocates gone wild [VIDEO].....

Meet Sandy and Steve (see time-lapse video below).

It appears they've made a secret deal with city leaders — behind closed doors — to position themselves to covertly draw attention to the plight of geese. Perhaps the two like a mix of biking, art, talking and a riverside view. Whatever the reason, they've placed their home on the banks of the Zumbro River just south of the Rochester Art Center in Rochester, Minnesota.

DSCF1457
[Snoozing while keeping the eggs warm and safe. Photo by Jeff Hansel. Copyright.]

Meet Sandy and Steve, who are actually a pair of geese who raised a family, enjoyed the sun, watched passing birds, hunkered down during all-day rains and faced tragedy when not all of their eggs hatched, yet successfully ended up with goslings.

DSCF1485
[Once the goslings hatched, this egg was left behind. One day I thought the goslings had hatched because Sandy and Steve (the names I gave the pair) were missing. I didn't film or take photos, but an adult returned and plopped down on the nest. The eggs had been covered and kept warm by down feathers! Photo by Jeff Hansel. Copyright.]

I got a kick out of what I saw and wanted to share a sort of time-lapse video with you. I often advise folks visiting town for medical treatment to take in local sports, entertainment, shopping and to get outside if they're able to explore.

So kick back and enjoy a little taste of Rochester at its best — A VIDEO FOR YOUR ENJOYMENT.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

05/30/2011

An assessment of Mayo Clinic Health System.... #RochMN

Now that a multitude of hospitals and clinics region-wide have gone from having names like "Austin Medical Center" to instead having signs out front that say "Mayo Clinic Health System" perhaps it's time to give you a rundown on where the health system currently sits numbers-wise.

According to Dr. Robert Nesse, MCHS CEO, the health system currently has:

• 900 physicians

• at 18 hospitals

• and 74 sites

"The Mayo Clinic Health System is bigger than the Mayo Clinic was when I arrived here in 1980," Nesse told an audience at Mayo Clinic's home base here in Rochester, Minnesota recently.

The health system has sites in Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota, all within about a 200-mile radius of Rochester's Mayo Clinic campus, which is considered a "destination medical community" because patients who need specialized care often get referred here.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

Access Minnesota health data free....

The Minnesota Department of Health has officially launched "Minnesota Public Health Data Access: A Gateway to Minnesota Health and Environment Data."

According to the department, it's a site instigated by a CDC effort to "close the information gap in what is known about the impact of environmental hazards on public health."

CDC silver and blue wall plaque
[Wall insignia at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia. Photo by Jeff Hansel. Copyright.]

The Department of Health says the new site "provides a 'one stop shop' for data about health, the environment, and other risk factors that may affect public health in Minnesota. Local public health professionals, the public and others may use MNPH Data Access to gather information about health and environment trends over time, and to conduct queries of state and county-level data in Minnesota about diseases and conditions, such as asthma, cancer and heart attacks."

So GO TO THE SITE, play around, have a little fun and see what you find.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

05/29/2011

Bedbug myths... (they're creepy — that one's true)...

Scientific American has some bedbug myths to share with you.

I'll give you the top five and let you seek out Scientific American for the rest.

Myth 1: Bedbugs can fly (they can't)

Myth 2: They reproduce like bunny rabbits (a female lays only 1 egg daily, compared with 500 eggs from female houseflies — yuck)

Myth 3: Bedbugs can live a year without a meal (two to three months, except when they're kept cold, when they might survive a year --- sounds kind of like a nearly true myth in my personal opinion)

Myth 4: Bedbugs bite only at night. (If you sit on the couch during daytime and they're hungry, they'll come after you! Yikes.)

Myth 5: Bedbugs live only in mattresses. (Nope. They can be on chairs, railings, and other surfaces too.)

Apparently these critters have been getting more prolific in recent years. I'm kind of freaked out right now. What's that crawling on the computer screen...?!?

Oh, whew, it's on yours.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

If you plan a barbeque this weekend...

The University of Minnesota is offering tips for safe barbecuing, as families often have their first barbecues during the Memorial Day weekend.

"This year, Memorial Day will be met with an extra dose of excitement in Minnesota, where a long, cold winter has residents eager for warmer weather," says a statement from the University Twin Cities campus. I echo that with my own "you're not kidding!"

The U also suggests this is a time to recharge.

"It turns out that a Memorial Day barbeque may do more than fill your stomach — it might just put a big helping of positivity back on your plate," the U points out. "In a new study published in Psychological Science, researchers found that the music and comfort foods of a barbeque reduce loneliness and boost positive feelings."

So, sidle up to that potato salad, get cozy and recharge your batteries, whether you're a veteran, a civilian, a public servant or a local laborer.

Here are those safety tips:

• Cook meat or poultry products to a temperature that kills bacteria (145 degrees Fahrenheit, plus 3 minutes of "rest" during which the temperature continues to kill bacteria).

• Avoid cross-contamination of foods. Don't expose cooked, ready-to-eat foods to raw chicken, meat juice (from plates or your or a child's fingers, for example).

• Chill foods properly and reheat thoroughly before eating. Leave food out no more than 1 hour in heat of 90 degrees or more. If it's under 90 degrees, get food into the fridge within 2 hours.

• Wash your hands, wash your kids' hands, wash everybody's hands. 
"It's the easiest way to keep bacteria from your guests," the U reports.

I'll add that adults (and kids) should know where the garden hose is, know where the fire extinguisher is and know where the phones are to call 911 in the (not so?) unlikely event your barbeque gets, say, a little toastier than you intended.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

05/28/2011

Parkinson's connection to pesticides and herbicides....

Nature.com is reporting that a long-held belief that farmers and farm laborers are more likely to experience Parkinson's disease now has been confirmed with three pesticides and herbicides.

Initial studies couldn't confirm the chemical-human disease connection.

"So, researchers turned to rodent models to prove the link. In the last decade, researchers found that three bug and weed killers promoted neurodegeneration in mice. And now, an independent team has validated those findings in a large epidemiological survey in humans," Nature reports. 

A UCLA research team looked at 25-year pesticide exposure in about 700 people.

"…People who lived or worked near farmlands treated with two commonly used agricultural fungicides — ziram and maneb — as well as the herbicide paraquat were three times more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease," Nature's blog notes.

I find this fascinating as I have relatives affected by Parkinson's disease. Wonder what role genetics plays with chemical susceptibility.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

Mayo Clinic reaches out with ebooks.... #RochMN

Here's a new form of "medical education" for you to consider.

How about educating the patient, instead of the doctor?

Rochester, Minnesota's Mayo Clinic, it seems, has stepped into a new realm of medical education by publishing the first of what it expects will be a whole line of ebooks.

The "Mayo Clinic Guide to a Healthy Pregnancy" comes to light through a collaboration between Mayo and Rosetta Books, which dubs itself "an independent e-book publisher based in New York City" started in 2001.

A total of 15 ebooks are expected to be published this year.

"Rosetta will also present the e-book editions of Mayo Clinic’s line of self-published print books, which are currently sold only by direct response by Mayo Clinic," a clinic announcement says. "This line covers a wide variety of topics including arthritis, Alzheimer’s, fitness, healthy aging, osteoporosis, pain relief, and other significant health care interests."

It's just one more step in Mayo's many efforts to reach out to patients and bring the "Mayo model of care" to more people in Minnesota, nationally and around the globe.

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

05/27/2011

Trevor Bayne seeks answers from Mayo Clinic.... #RochMN

Daytona 500 champion (still only 20 years old!) Trevor Bayne has reportedly been visiting Mayo Clinic — to learn what he doesn't have.

Multiple media sources have reported that Bayne has been experiencing bouts of shoulder pain, double vision and nausea.

"The symptoms originally were linked to an apparent insect bite received the Sunday after the Martinsville Sprint Cup race, but there has been no definitive diagnosis even after Bayne spent several weeks undergoing tests in the Mayo Clinic," ESPN reported a week ago (May 19, 2011).

This week, ESPN reported Bayne would be sidelined from the Nationwide and Sprint Cup Series at the Charlotte Motor Speedway this weekend, due to his symptoms.

"The symptoms were originally linked to an apparent insect bite received the Sunday after the Martinsville Sprint Cup race, but there has been no definitive diagnosis even after Bayne spent several weeks undergoing tests in the Mayo Clinic," ESPN says

Bayne spent a week here in Rochester, Minnesota at Mayo, according to the New York Times. Doctors hope his illness was an isolated, one-time event, says the Virginian-Pilot, which says Bayne expects to return to Mayo in three or four months.

My best wishes that this was indeed a one-time event. Having experienced double vision myself after an injection that hit a nerve prior to laser surgery for my eye (and told that it "might" be temporary), I can say that it's scary.

My double vision about 15 years ago resolved and never came back. Hope the same will be true for Bayne. 

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel

05/26/2011

Music for the soul at Mayo Clinic... #RochMN

Mayo Clinic here in Rochester, Minnesota plans outdoor musical entertainment this summer, and you're invited.

"Community members are invited to enjoy four Rosemary and Meredith Willson Harmony for Mayo Program concerts in June. The outdoor performances will be on Mondays from 12:10 to 1 p.m. at the Rochester Peace Plaza at the corner of First Street S.W. and First Avenue S.W.," says an announcement from Mayo.

Rain? No worries, mate. Just hop on down to the subway level of the Mayo Charlton Building (attached to Rochester Methodist Hospital) and find the Barbara Woodward Lips Atrium.

Scheduled performances include:

June 6 (2011) Minnesota native Ann Reed, acoustic folk
"Her early influences include: the Kingston Trio, Joni Mitchell, Buffalo Springfield and Pete Seeger," the clinic notes.

June 13 Peter Mayer, acoustic folk
"Mayer regularly plays to sold-out concerts from New England to Colorado and south to Texas. Mayer's songs are about interconnectedness and the human journey. His whimsical, humorous and profound lyrics are heavily influenced by his time in seminary and theological training."

June 20 Honors Choirs of Southeastern Minnesota, a review of the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical, "Annie," based on the comic strip "Little Orphan Annie."
"The Honors Choirs is a nonprofit organization of five auditioned youth choirs for singers in grades three through 12."

June 27 Sarah Pray, alternative contemporary
"A Madison, Wis., native, Pray has commanding vocal power and writes heartfelt lyrics that she hopes will connect emotionally with audiences."

Pulse on Health
By Jeff Hansel, member Association of Health Care Journalists
Health Reporter for the PostBulletin.com, 18 1st Ave. S.E. in Rochester, Minnesota 55904 
Twitter Hansel's Pulse: @Jeff Hansel