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60 posts categorized "Web/Tech"

September 19, 2016

It's a brave new blog

Kigersaysheh-tshirtAfter 11 years of all sorts of news, goofiness, errors, corrections, thousands of 'Hehs' and more, things are changing at this blog.

New "blog" postings are now moving to a new blog section on the revamped and upgraded Post-Bulletin web site. Right now my recent columns are collected there, but expect new, incredibly interesting postings to go up there soon.

This blog will remain live on Typepad, so everyone can still access the years and years of Kiger typos, until we get all of the archives shifted to the new version of the blog.

So hang on, we're going off-roading into new territory. It might get a bit bumpy, but I promise it will be fun.

June 14, 2016

Software giant buys Rochester's DoApp

Wade-beaversDoApp Inc., an 8-year-old Rochester media technology firm, was acquired this week by the top software firm in the newspaper industry.

Newscycle Solutions bought DoApp to become part of a new mobile division to add to its services for newspapers and expand into television and radio. Bloomington, Minn.-based Newscycle, which is owned by Vista Equity Partners, works with 92 of the top 100 U.S. newspapers as well as 1,200 companies in 45 countries.

DoApp-logo-square_400x400Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

DoApp co-founder Wade Beavers says Newscycle has worked with DoApp on various projects and the relationship just deepened until this became the logical step. Beavers, now president of Newscycle's mobile division, says this acquisition is good for his company and for Rochester. All 13 employees now have jobs with Newscycle and the division will remain in Rochester in the former DoApp office at 1652 Greenview Drive SW.

"You'll definitely see more employees in Rochester. Newscycle is very strategic on growth," said Beavers. "They plan to stay here."

Beavers co-founded DoApp with Joe Sriver with help from Dave Borrillo in 2008. In the early days, Beavers and Borrillo created early iPhone apps while drinking coffee in Rochester's south Panera eatery. Three DoApp apps were among the first 500 sold on Apple's then-new App Store.

The Newscycle sale marks the third major "exit" for DoApp, since it launched.

In 2012, Raleigh, N.C.-based Axial Exchange acquired mRemedy, which DoApp created with Mayo Clinic. It focused on making patient-focused mobile health-care apps.

DoApp also sold its popular mobile real estate platform to CoreLogic, of Irvine, Calif. in 2014. Borrillo, previously DoApp’s chief operating officer, joined CoreLogic along with all of the DoApp employees working on the real estate app. CoreLogic kept the office in Rochester and it has added several jobs since the acquisition.

“DoApp has led the way for media companies to be the best in their markets with an awesome mobile experience that hasn’t been matched,” said Beavers in Monday's announcement. “Becoming part of the Newscycle family will allow us to create a more complete experience that will take publishers forward and connect them to their audiences across all devices.”

 

January 28, 2016

Semiconductor maker to open new Rochester office

GlofoAfter its $1.3 billion acquisition of IBM's computer chip operations in 2015, an international semiconductor company is setting up a new office in Rochester.


GlobalFoundaries, which is owned by an investment arm of the Abu Dhabi government, bought IBM's Microelectronics Division in July 2015. That deal gave the California-based company a footprint in Rochester.


"As part of this transaction, we acquired a team of about 30 engineers based in Rochester. These engineers are part of the global design team for our application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) business unit," said Jason Gorss, senior manager of corporate and technology communications.


GlobalFoundaries' deal also included major IBM facilities in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and Burlington, Vt. 3555-9th-St-building-front-690x410

That team has continued to work at IBM's Rochester campus since the acquisition. Now the company is renovating an off-campus space in north Rochester. GlobalFoundaries is revamping a spot at 3555 Ninth St. NW. That's in the commercial center off of West Circle Drive, behind Kwik Trip.

Semiconductor maker PMC-Sierra operated there from 2010 to 2012. PMC-Sierra was collaborating with IBM at that time on "a multicore, multithreaded RAID solution." The resulting maxRAID device was used in IBM's System x EXA servers. That office closed when PMC-Sierra abruptly pulled out of Rochester.

Since PMC-Sierra left, the about 8,000-square-foot space has been briefly used by other tenants, such as the Minnesota Department of National Resourcesand outdoors retailer Scheels as a hiring office for its large Rochester store.

Gorss expects GlobalFoundaries to be in up and running in the spot in the near future.

"Beginning some time in Q2 2016, we plan to move this (Rochester) team into the independent office," he said in an email.

 

October 20, 2015

Google brings its delivery service to Rochester

Searching for next day delivery service in Rochester?

The world's largest search engine might be the answer.

Google Express launched service in the Rochester area this morning, which is its first foray in Minnesota.

"We want to make users lives easier and help out merchants reach more customers," said Google Express' General Manager Brian Elliot. "We have crazy busy lives these days. This is about giving you back some time."

Google-ExpressMountain View, Calif.-based search engine company Google launched Google Express two years ago to expand its commerce arm, offering an alternative to Amazon Prime.

Elliot's example is parents who have a kid's birthday party and are signed up to provide snacks for the soccer teams. Elliott says at long as the orders are made by 5 p.m. the day before, Google Express can deliver the next day.

However, don't expect to see any delivery trucks pull up with "Google Express" on the side. Unlike regional distribution centers used by Amazon or UPS, Google Express works directly with retailers and contracts with local courier services.

It has deals with 18 merchants like Whole Foods, Costco, Staples,Toys R Us, Barnes & Noble, PetSmart, Walgreens and more. The retailers put their available products out on Google Express' online catalog. Consumers chose what they want. The store packages it up and a courier delivers it.

Google Express, which has been running this new service in areas like Chicago and San Francisco, offers an annual membership for $95. Members get free overnight shipping on most items, as long they meet the store's minimum order requirements of $15. There's $3 service fee for orders that don't meet the minimum levels.

For non-members, delivery costs start at $4.99 per store for eligible orders. The fee for orders under the minimum sizes is $3, the same as members.

While Google Express is introducing this service in the Rochester area, it is not covering Minneapolis or St. Paul yet.

"We got up to Rochester, but to the Twin Cities. We'd love to get there. Over time, I'd expect we will," said Elliot. "It's a sort of a one-step at a time project."

He explained that Rochester is closer to Google Express' Midwest hub of Chicago and the retailers here have the capacity to offer the service.

Of course, the big target here for Google is its tech rival, Amazon.

During a recent European trip, former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, outlined the rivalry.

“Many people think our main competition is Bing or Yahoo. But, really, our biggest search competitor is Amazon," he said. "People don’t think of Amazon as search, but if you are looking for something to buy, you are more often than not looking for it on Amazon.”

There is a lot at stake in the growing delivery market. It is currently a  $10.9 billion industry, which is expected to grow by of 9.6 percent by 2019. The U.S. market for same day delivery, which Google Express offers in San Francisco and Chicago, is predicted to swell to $4.03 billion by 2018.

May 05, 2015

Tech security chief leaves Mayo Clinic for new job

Mayo Clinic's chief information security officer is leaving Rochester to join a Colorado technology firm.

3a01a19James Carder made the announcement on Twitter Tuesday saying, "It's with mixed emotions to announce that I have officially left Mayo Clinic and taken a new role as CISO (chief information security officer) @LogRhythm & VP of @LogRhythmLabs."

Carder was Mayo's technology security chief from June 2013 until this week. Described as "a frequent speaker at industry events and noted author of several security publications," Carder managed the security of the 250,000 to 300,000 devices connected to Mayo Clinic's network, according to the Wall Street Journal.

While at Mayo Clinic, the Wall Street Journal said he also created "an incident response infrastructure" and as well as Mayo Clinic’s first cyber threat intelligence organization.

At LogRhythm, Carder will serve as the chief information security officer and vice president of LogRhythm Labs. The Boulder, Colo.-based firm stated in the announcement of the hiring that Carder will set "the vision for and direct the company’s global information security program." He will manage 12 employees.

Carder told the Wall Street Journal that his primary reason for the move is "speed."

“The main difference is that things you do have a ripple effect quickly,” he explained to the WSJ.

July 09, 2014

Does IBM have future in Vermont?

Here's a little chunk from a well-researched, long article written by Paul Heintz from Vermont's alt paper, Seven Days.

While there is no direct link (as far as I know) between the fate of the Vermont campus and the one in Rochester, this does sound familiar. For anyone interested in the what is happening with Big Blue, this is a pretty worth-while read.

You can read the full article at this link.

What we're looking at is a city," Frank Cioffi says, nodding at a sprawling landscape of industrial buildings, electrical transformers and storage tanks on the banks of the Winooski River.

The 59-year-old economic development guru steers his black Nissan Maxima toward a guard shack that stands sentry at the northeastern entrance to IBM's Essex Junction campus.

"We're not going to Bildebe able to get in," he says, pulling a U-turn and retreating from the fortress. "Security is watching us."

In more certain times, the Greater Burlington Industrial Corporation president might easily escort a reporter through the 725-acre campus, which GBIC developed from farmland 60 years ago. But with Big Blue reportedly nearing a sale of its chip-making division to Emirate of Abu Dhabi-owned GlobalFoundries, IBM Vermont is on lockdown.

Even Cioffi, its loudest local cheerleader, is in the dark about what a sale might mean for the 4,000-plus jobs remaining at the facility. Like many, he suspects IBM will reveal its intentions next week when it releases its second- quarter earnings report.

"We're dealing with two public corporations that aren't going to tell us anything, because they can't," he says.

Clouds of uncertainty have lingered over Essex Junction for more than a decade, as the company has retrenched and its Vermont workforce dwindled from a 2001 peak of 8,500. But never have the skies above the industrial park looked so dark.Ibm-logo

As IBM repositions itself as a services-oriented company focused on cloud computing, it has jettisoned less profitable hardware operations. In January, it struck a deal to sell off its low-end server business to China-based Lenovo for $2.3 billion.

Though GlobalFoundries specializes in the very chip-manufacturing work conducted at the Essex Junction plant, reports in the financial press have indicated that the company is interested in IBM's patents and engineers — not its aging facilities.

May 13, 2014

LSI becomes Avago, impact on Roch. office uncertain

05132014avagomainsignLSI Corp., which designs semiconductors and software, officially became part of Avago Technologies last week as the $6.6 billion acquistion officially closed.

That change reportedly has LSI/Avago employees in Rochester wondering about their future.

05132014avagoinsidesignUnofficial buzz around the change is that a decision is being made this week about keeping the Rochester jobs here or moving them out of state.

It's unclear how many people currently work at the site here at 3033 41st St. N.W., though LSI has employed between 10 to 30 people here at different times over the years. LSI also has Minnesota facilities in Bloomington and Mendota Heights.

LSI has had an "on again, off again relationship" with Rochester dating back to 2002, when it leased 20,000 square feet of space in the Valley Business Center II at 3425 40th Ave. N.W. It had about 29 employees.

On June 30, 2006, LSI closed its Rochester site. It had 11 employees, when it closed.

AgeremailboxThen in November 2006, Allentown, Penn.-based Agere Systems opened a 6,000-square-foot office at 3033 41st St. N.W. Agere hired a team of 10 local storage design engineers that formerly worked for Maxtor Corp.’s Rochester office. That office closed in 2006 when Maxtor was acquired by Seagate Technologies.

LSI re-appeared in Rochester in December 2006, when it bought Agere Systems. Soon the signs at 3033 41st St. N.W. turned into LSI.

That's where everything stood until the arrival of Avago. In the press release announcing the acquistions, Avago stated that it anticipates saving $200 million by Nov. 1, 2015. That might be interpretated as plans to close some of LSI's 26 facilities.

I'll do my best to keep an eye on this to see what happens next. If anyone has information, official or otherwise, about this, I'm interested in hearing it.

March 31, 2014

Lots of construction cooking at Big Blue

Lots of construction is in the works on IBM's sprawling Rochester campus.

IBM buildinglogoSome final work still is underway in buildings 333 and 002 for Charter Communications. The cable-television provider is leasing those buildings to house an estimated $3.5 million expansion of Charter Business, its business-to-business division.

Charter says the expansion will add more than 140 jobs to its Rochester operations. The company is planning a ribbon-cutting ceremony for April 15 in Building 002 on the IBM campus.

While neither Charter nor IBM are discussing it yet, a permit also has been submitted to the city planning department for interior demolition of IBM's Building 005. Charter-business-logo

The permit describes the demolition as preparing the building for "Future Charter Business."  The value of this project is listed as $3.25 million.

Without information from Charter or IBM, it's unclear what this permit signifies. However, Building 005 is connected to Building 002, so it's possible Charter needs more space for its expansion and it possibly is leasing a third building from IBM.

HgstLook for more details about this project in the near future.

Meanwhile, HGST has construction of its own cooking in one of the buildings it leases from IBM. Western Digital's HGST, formerly owned by Hitachi, is working on a Crossfit workout center and locker room. That project is valued at $325,900.

Big Blue also has some construction in the works on its Rochester campus.

A permit has been filed for an "acoustic chamber upgrade" valued at $195,000 in IBM's Building 020.

January 28, 2014

Mayo Clinic to ramp up link to Dept. of Defense

My colleague Jeff Hansel is writing an article about Mayo Clinic opening an office called Mayo Clinic Department of Defense Medical Research Office to better connect with Dept. of Defense for contracts and research.

Watch for Jeff's article on this soon.

I've touched on this topic in past years, so I dug up some info about recent DOD contracts with Mayo.

MayodefenseSince 2000, Mayo Clinic in Rochester has received about $41 million from the DOD. About $37 million of that $41 million was paid out for "Research and Development - Missile/Space Systems - Advanced Development," according to federal government records.

The majority of that work is done at the Dept. of Defense Medical Research Office, which is in the Mayo Support Center on West Circle Drive. That office has long been spearheaded by Dr. Barry K. Gilbert.

Some of the recent projects, according to federal contract records, include:

• R&D Services for Development and Demonstration of Capabilities of Hybrid Supercomputer

• Development of Ultra-High Linearity X-Band Mixers

• Study of Energy Harvesting Concepts, Evaluation of Quantum Orbital Magnetic Resonance Technologies

•R&D Services for Study of Energy Harvesting System Concepts

• Optical Communications: Monte Carlo Model - Preparation of Full-Scale Optical Communications Test.

I can't pretend to know what much of that means, though I believe the hybrid computer deal has something to do with immunizations and fighting virulent outbreaks. The optical communcations, I think, has something to do with transmitting medical information between hospital sites.

I confess this side of Mayo has always fascinated me. Hopefully, the creation of this new office will mean more of a spotlight will shine on Mayo Clinic's interesting military work.

November 11, 2013

Mayo Clinic, U of M startup ready for software rollout

Rochester's Evidentia Health got some press last week about its impending rollout at Fairview Health Systems.

Evidentia Health was one of the first tenants of Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator when it opened early this year.

Its billed as a health care IT company with licensed expe02272013mayoaccelerator1rtise and medical content from both Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota

It was co-founded by Mayo Clinic's Dr. Jeremy Friese in early 2012.Friese, an interventional radiologist, is the medical director for new ventures and business development in the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine.

Evidentia was profiled on Wednesday by TechdotMN, a non-profit business media group. Here's some from that piece by Yael Grauer:

As new provisions from the Affordable Healthcare Act take effect, Minnesota startup Evidentia Health is poised to help patients better understand their electronic health records (EHRs) while helping physicians meet criteria for “meaningful use” of EHR technology to improve patient care.

To receive EHR incentive pay under Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, healthcare providers must show they are meaningfully using EHRs by meeting various objectives.  Patients are required to be able to access their medical information within three days of when it’s created, and in 2014, this will be within one day.

The problem is that viewing EHR material and doing research online can be confusing to patients. They can jump to the wrong conclusions, worry unnecessarily and often have questions for their care team that may not be applicable.

Evidentia provides reports to both patients and physicians. The reports for patients include the most important sources of information, as well as secondary information for those interested in even more. In addition to the material in patient reports, physicians also receive recent medical research for evidence-based medicine studies.

----

Founded in October 2012, Evidentia is funded by Mayo Clinic Ventures and the University of Minnesota. A pilot program is taking place at the Family Practice Internal Medicine groups in Rochester, and Evidentia is prepared to deploy within Fairview at University Hospital.

As new provisions from the Affordable Healthcare Act take effect, Minnesota startup Evidentia Health is poised to help patients better understand their electronic health records (EHRs) while helping physicians meet criteria for “meaningful use” of EHR technology to improve patient care.

To receive EHR incentive pay under Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, healthcare providers must show they are meaningfully using EHRs by meeting various objectives.  Patients are required to be able to access their medical information within three days of when it’s created, and in 2014, this will be within one day.

The problem is that viewing EHR material and doing research online can be confusing to patients. They can jump to the wrong conclusions, worry unnecessarily and often have questions for their care team that may not be applicable.

Evidentia provides reports to both patients and physicians. The reports for patients include the most important sources of information, as well as secondary information for those interested in even more. In addition to the material in patient reports, physicians also receive recent medical research for evidence-based medicine studies.

“Evidentia brings together all of the information that you need to know and get it in your hands in a way that’s both credible and trustworthy, has been reviewed by physicians, and is applicable to your situation,” says CTO Brent Backhaus.

When patients access their electronic medical records, they’ve often confused about certain key phrases or conditions. Evidentia looks at the text of the reports, highlights key phrases, and presents individualized information to the patient. The information selected is both algorithmically selected and reviewed by a physician.

“We pick information to present to both to the patient and the physician that make the most sense for them to see at that point in time about their specific condition,” Backhaus says.

In addition to Backhaus, who was the founding CTO of Virtual Radiologic, Evidentia’s team includes CEO Jeremy Friese, a Harvard MBA and Associate Chair of Radiology at Mayo Clinic, and chief product officer Dan Steinberger, a U of M physician and technology leader, and founder of ProVation Medical (which had a $100m exit in 2006).

Founded in October 2012, Evidentia is funded by Mayo Clinic Ventures and the University of Minnesota. A pilot program is taking place at the Family Practice Internal Medicine groups in Rochester, and Evidentia is prepared to deploy within Fairview at University Hospital.

- See more at: http://tech.mn/news/2013/11/06/evidentia-health-mayo-clinic-ventures/#sthash.tL8tSBOX.dpuf
Yael Grauer
Yael Grauer
Yael Grauer
Yael Grauer

As new provisions from the Affordable Healthcare Act take effect, Minnesota startup Evidentia Health is poised to help patients better understand their electronic health records (EHRs) while helping physicians meet criteria for “meaningful use” of EHR technology to improve patient care.

To receive EHR incentive pay under Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, healthcare providers must show they are meaningfully using EHRs by meeting various objectives.  Patients are required to be able to access their medical information within three days of when it’s created, and in 2014, this will be within one day.

The problem is that viewing EHR material and doing research online can be confusing to patients. They can jump to the wrong conclusions, worry unnecessarily and often have questions for their care team that may not be applicable.

Evidentia provides reports to both patients and physicians. The reports for patients include the most important sources of information, as well as secondary information for those interested in even more. In addition to the material in patient reports, physicians also receive recent medical research for evidence-based medicine studies.

“Evidentia brings together all of the information that you need to know and get it in your hands in a way that’s both credible and trustworthy, has been reviewed by physicians, and is applicable to your situation,” says CTO Brent Backhaus.

When patients access their electronic medical records, they’ve often confused about certain key phrases or conditions. Evidentia looks at the text of the reports, highlights key phrases, and presents individualized information to the patient. The information selected is both algorithmically selected and reviewed by a physician.

“We pick information to present to both to the patient and the physician that make the most sense for them to see at that point in time about their specific condition,” Backhaus says.

In addition to Backhaus, who was the founding CTO of Virtual Radiologic, Evidentia’s team includes CEO Jeremy Friese, a Harvard MBA and Associate Chair of Radiology at Mayo Clinic, and chief product officer Dan Steinberger, a U of M physician and technology leader, and founder of ProVation Medical (which had a $100m exit in 2006).

Founded in October 2012, Evidentia is funded by Mayo Clinic Ventures and the University of Minnesota. A pilot program is taking place at the Family Practice Internal Medicine groups in Rochester, and Evidentia is prepared to deploy within Fairview at University Hospital.

- See more at: http://tech.mn/news/2013/11/06/evidentia-health-mayo-clinic-ventures/#sthash.tL8tSBOX.dpufis it will roll out its technology this year.