News Business Sports Entertainment Life Obituaries Opinion
Jobs Homes Cars Classifieds Shopping
Local Bloggers Cheap Tech Eco-Confessions Faceoff Furst Draft Heard on the Street Med City Movie Guy Pulse on Health Political Party

Search PB Blogs

Loading

Categories

1356 posts categorized "Retail news"

March 30, 2015

Rochester's Kismet to open the door to 'Mad Men' style

Behind door #1 is a blast from the past plus a new name on Rochester's North Broadway block of consignment shopping.

KismetdoorPenny Bracken, known for her three Kismet stores on the 600 block of North Broadway, closed off the back third of the Kismet Home store with a sliding, barn-style door this winter. The mysterious door has spurred her loyal customers to speculate for months about what's behind it.

And now as spring slowly starts in Minnesota, Bracken is ready to unveil her winter project. The doors will officially open on Wednesday, though she isn't waiting until April 1 to discuss it.

"It's called Kismet Etc.," she said. "That's where we've been collecting hip, modern furniture and decor with that clean 'Mad Men,' Boho chic style."

Bracken says she and her staff have been watching the interest in this style grow over the past couple of years and they decided to create an area to spotlight it for shoppers.

"The trend right now is that people, especially young people, are really attracted to the clean lines of this mid-century style," said Bracken.

She also has changes planned for the exterior of the 611 North Broadway store. The name, Kismet Etc., will go up on the sign outside. That will make the lineup of stores on "Penny Lane" as Kismet Consignment Fashions at 601 N. Broadway, Kismet Central at 607 N. Broadway and Kismet Etc. at 611 North Broadway.

Besides opening the doors on Wednesday, a Kismet spring tradition also will happen on Wednesday. The new Kismet billboard will go up over the store. While "Chloe," the stylish woman in the hat, will still be part of it, a new circular wave design will make its appearance as Kismet's new logo. Look for Chloe to be holding it.

The long mural on the side of the 611 North Broadway building also will be updated to reflect the new look and style. Bracken is planning to take down about 16 feet of the current mural and have it replaced by new work by popular Rochester muralist Greg Wimmer. 

March 26, 2015

Furniture store owners buy building for $5 million

A year after quadrupling the size of their businesses by leasing the former Menards North store, two Rochester retailers have purchased the building for $5 million.

Jim Sather and Mark Byer moved Furniture Superstore and America's Mattress into the complex at 5150 U.S. 52 North last spring, shortly after Mernards moved to a new store. They were leasing the huge store and the surrounding 10 acres of property with an option to buy it after a year.

They closed on the deal to buy it for $5.09 million from John Mernard Jr. on March 17.

"Our intent all along was to buy the building," Sather said Wednesday. "Business has been stellar here. That and outstanding support from Bremer Bank helped make this happen. It's a big deal for us."

Sather and Byer also bought the adjacent Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft store for $2.4 million on the same day, but they immediately sold it to Rochester-based Brackenridge 52 LLC for $3.4 million. While it's unclear who the new owners are, it appears the very successful Jo-Ann Fabric store will remain where it is for now.

Now that they own the building, Sather and Byer plan to upgrade their store. The first step is to remodel inside the store and then reface the building within the next 12 months or so, Sather said.

A team of 18 employees staff the furniture/mattress store. However, it isn't just retail sales that's driving the business. They are renting out portions of the former Menards outdoor lumber yard for boat and RV storage. Other businesses, including a trucking firm, are  using the yard for storage.

They also are considering other business possibilities on the land in front of and behind the facility.

"We'll see what happens," Sather said.

March 13, 2015

A New Age shop opens in Rochester's Cooke Park Design District

The owner of a new Rochester shop hopes to fill a spiritual void in this area.

Brinn McManus opened the doors of A Beautiful Soul on Friday at 619 6th Ave. NW. That's where Culligan water used to operate until it moved to Woodlake Drive Southeast in 2006.

Beautifulsoul1McManus describes her new business as "Rochester's first New Age Metaphysical gift store." It carries a variety of things like, healing herbs, gems, crystal, jewelry and aromatherapy materials.

"There is definitely a need for this," she said. "That's obvious by how many people have been stopping by even before were ready to open."

A Beautiful Soul is also more than just a gift shop. It also has Reiki master Teri Anderson on staff to offer Reiki, reflexology and acupressure treatments on site. McManus also plans to offer individual and group mediation classes as well as hosting visiting psychic practitioners and healers for weekend events.
Bautifulsoul2
"This is something I've wanted to do for some time, but it was never the right time or the right spot," she said. "Now I feel good that we've found the right spot."

A Beautiful Soul is the latest in a string of small artistic and unique businesses that have opened recently in that once faded neighborhood. Paul Bennett opened Dwell Local,a design and art shop in the former Paw and Claws building at 602 Seventh St. NW. The Urban Easel art studio soon opened next door at 608 Seventh St. NW. A European auto repair shop, Werkstatt 533, then came in and renovated an empty brick warehouse just up the street at 533 Sixth Ave NW.

The word is that a well-known floral arts designer may also be moving into the area soon.

All of that activity is leading people like McManus and Bennett to start dubbing the northwest neighborhood as the Cooke Park Design District.

It seems like a Renaissance of sorts is underway in the Cooke Park area, so the new name seems to fit pretty well at this point.

March 06, 2015

10 years of blogging Rochester

On March 4, 2005, I wrote my first blog post. Kiger's Notebook blogo 2x

It was my sixth year at the Post-Bulletin. I created the "Heard on the Street" column about three years before the blog began. 

More  than 6,200 posts, stacks of columns, mountains of tweets and many gray hairs later, I'm still here writing about business and things vaguely related to businesPhoto on 2015-03-03 at 18.11s in southeastern Minnesota.

It'syou, the readers, who make this career such a fulfilling and entertaining one. Thank you everyone for your feedback, criticism and support over these past 10 years. 

10 years of blogging Rochester

On March 4, 2005, I wrote my first blog post.Kiger's Notebook blogo 2x

It was my siPhoto on 2015-03-03 at 18.11xth year at the Post-Bulletin. I created the "Heard on the Street" column about three years before the blog began. 

More than 6,200 posts, stacks of columns, mountains of tweets and many gray hairs later, I'm still here writing about business and things vaguely related to business in southeastern Minnesota.

It's you, the readers, who make this career such a fulfilling and entertaining one. Thank you everyone for your feedback, criticism and support over these past 10 years.  

February 19, 2015

Forager Brewing Co. on tap for Kutzky neighborhood

Here's some from my article today about a proposed brewery/coffee house/wood fired pizza shop and local market.

-------

A new project promises to bring a small batch brewery, wood fired pizzas, a coffee shop and more to Rochester's Kutzky neighborhood by this summer.

Foragersketch1The plan is to transform 5,000-square-feet of the former Good Food Store building at 1005 Sixth Street NW into The Kutzky Market. Spearheaded by majority owner Annie Henderson, the concept is to bring together a coffee shop, brewery/restaurant, a leasable commercial kitchen, and a local retail market.

"With everything going on with DMC (Destination Medical Center initiative) and the hype around downtown, we decided to look in the core neighborhoods," said Henderson. "We wanted it to be something community based and neighborhood based, but still walkable from a lot of people's houses."

The building has been empty since the Good Food Store closed in 2013 and merged with the People's Food Cooperative in downtown Rochester.

Kutzky Market has a lot of permits and construction yet to get through before it becomes a reality. She estimates it should be ready to open sometime this summer. Some interior demolition has already started and the hope is for construction to start in earnest in March.

The main piece of this new project is Forager Brewing Co. as well as its daytime counterpart, Kutzky Coffee. Head brewer and part owner Austin Jevne will run Forager, where he will produce small batches of beer using local ingredients. The name of the brewer comes from the fact that many of the ingredients that Jevne uses are foraged from the southeastern Minnesota countryside.

Jevne the brewer and Henderson the visionary were connected by the owners of the Thirsty Belgium bar, where Jevne worked.

"It's kind of a perfect match," she said. "Austin already had that name (Forager) in mind. We thought it was a really cool name and now it's become a big part of our identity.

The conversation started about mid-January and now about month later, Kutzky Market is moving ahead.

Forager will also be a full restaurant with a focus on local, seasonal ingredients. A large wood-fired oven will be used for many of Chef Jordan Bell's dishes, including pizzas. Bell comes to Forager from the popular Nosh Bar & Restaurant in Lake City.

Another owner, Rochester architect Adam Ferrari describes Forager as "the Farmer's Market approach to beer making and pizza."

During the day, the restaurant space will serve as the Kutzky Coffee shop.

Henderson's vision also includes The Kitchen, a commercial kitchen available for lease.

"Say you want to make things to sell at the Farmer's Market. You could lease the Kitchen for that and you could also sell your things in our retail market," she said.

The Kutzky Market will focus on locally created goods, including foods created by Chef Bell.

And then there's the artistic piece. Henderson is very active with various downtown Rochester groups, including the C4 art salon, so she intends to have periodic artists-in-residence as well as three walls for the display of local art.

Forager will also feature a piece of Rochester history. The group purchased the bar from Pappageorge Taverna at the recent auction of the furnishing, art and equipment from Michaels restaurant.

"This is a marriage of all of these different fun, entrepreneurial uses under one roof," said Ferrari of the whole project.

February 13, 2015

Reuters: Hormel's near big buy of organic hot dog, bacon maker

Reuters' Olivia Oran filed an interesting story Thursday about Austin's favorite Fortune 500 company.

363Hormel Foods reportedly is "in late-stage talks" to snap up Applegate Farms. Applegate is in the organic pork biz and makes organic hot dogs, bacon and sausage.

Here's a snippet from the Reuters' piece:

A deal for Applegate Farms could be announced as early as next week and value the Bridgewater, New Jersey-based company at between $600 million and $1 billion, the people said, asking not to be named because the matter is confidential.Spamproducts

This would make a lot sense. Applegate is in Hormel's sweet spot.

It processes a lot of hogs. It would extend Hormel's geographic reach. Plus it would them more deeply into the trendy market of organic meat.

We'll have to see if Oran's insider is right and/or if Hormel can close the deal.

 

February 06, 2015

Only one area Radio Shack store to close due to bankruptcy

Bankrupt Radio Shack Corp. is closing hundreds of stores across the U.S., though Red Wing in the only southeastern Minnesota one slated to close up shop.

Radio Shack is also closing another 25 stores. Most are in the Twin Cities. Area stores in Rochester's Apache Mall, as well as in Winona and Austin, will remain open.

RadioShack_Logo_2013However, wireless provider Sprint will most likely become primary brand name on each as part of a deal to establish a “store within a store” in up to 1,750 of the acquired RadioShacks.

The 94-year-old Fort Worth-based retail icon filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Thursday.

The consumer electronics chain, which began in Boston in 1921 as a mail-order operation supplying ship radio equipment, made the filing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, listing assets of $1.2 billion and total debt of $1.3 billion.

    The company also announced an agreement with Standard General, a New York hedge fund which provided a rescue loan to the company last fall, to purchase between 1,500 and 2,400 of the 4,000 company-owned RadioShack stores.

    The remaining RadioShack stores will be closed and their inventory sold off, if approved by the bankruptcy court.

    “These steps are the culmination of a thorough process intended to drive maximum value for our stakeholders,” said RadioShack’s chief executive Joseph Magnacca in a statement. RadioShack has also secured about $285 million in debtor-in-possession financing.

    The Chapter 11 filing ends a long period of decline for what was once known as America’s Technology Store, which ushered in the electronics revolution with calculators, laptop computers and cell phones but was unable to adjust to the latest wave of change.

    RadioShack, named for the part of the ship that houses radio equipment, began in Boston by two brothers in 1921 as a small retail and mail-order business. In 1963, it was acquired by Fort Worth’s Tandy Corp., a leather goods company, and moved here. The name became synonymous with its first mass-marketed personal computer, the TRS-80. Tandy Corp. changed its name to RadioShack in 2000.

January 27, 2015

Options abound for one of Rochester's oldest storefronts

While many are speculating about the future of a 129-year-old building in the heart of Rochester's downtown, the owners say they haven't locked down a plan yet.

549b9e10ed075.imageThe long-empty former Paine Furniture store at 313 S. Broadway was purchased by local developers Hal Henderson and Grant Michelitz in November. The deal also included the attached 309 S. Broadway building now occupied by Big Brad's bar on Broadway.

Some renovation work and installation of new windows is being done on the second floor, said Henderson. They also hope to build a skyway across the alley to connect the Paine building to the 318 Commons building, also owned by Henderson and Michelitz.

The University of Minnesota Rochester leases space in the 318 Commons building for student housing, office space and classrooms. A connecting skyway could make the second floor of Paine building attractive to UMR.

"We do foresee space crunches in our growth plan prior to the development of the future campus," said Jay Hesley, assistant vice chancellor for institutional advancement. While no decisions have been made, Hesley acknowledged the university had looked at the second floor of the Paine building.

"We've certainly explored all of the different opportunities that are available, and that was certainly one of them on the list," he said.

Henderson said there have been preliminary talks with UMR officials about the Paine building. He also said an option is to demolish the Paine complex and put up a building that would be a sibling to 318 Commons.

"I do have more real estate on that block," he said. "In the future, we may have a plan that we may try to unveil or look at pretty seriously." Henderson owns the adjacent Cafe Steam at 315 S. Broadway and the Canvas & Chardonnay building at 317 S. Broadway. "It all depends on what transpires in the next three to six months" with Destination Medical Center and the university's plans, he said. "I think right now, everyone is still leaving their options open."

January 23, 2015

WSN buying empty Home Design Studio on W. Circle Drive

After being empty for years, new life is on the way for a former home construction showroom in northwest Rochester. 

Widseth Smith Nolting, a Crookston-based engineering and architecture firm, announced this week it has signed a purchase agreement to buy the former Home Design Studio from Rochester's Event Studio LLC. The 32,000-square-foot complex is located at 3777 40th Ave. NW, along West Circle Drive.

HomeDesignDusk2-10x8_editedThe sale is expected to close in March with a build-out beginning in April, according to WSN. The plan is for WSN to move its increasingly crowded Rochester office into 11,000 square feet of the building by August.

"We are absolutely shoe-horned in here," said Brian Carlson, WSN's director of business development, of their current 4,500-square-foot office at 6301 Bandel Road NW. "We need to provide the space and resources for our team members to do what they do best."

WSN opened its Med City office in 2009, when it merged with QED Engineering. In 2014, it merged with Rochester's Kane and Johnson Architects. WSN now has 20 employees based here. WSN has a total of seven offices and 200 employees in Minnesota and North Dakota

The firm plans to lease the rest of the building to other tenants, probably to other professional offices. This is a very different fate than was expected for the Home Design Studio building. It opened for the first time in 2006 at the height of the construction boom, which imploded soon after.

It was designed by Kane and Johnson Architects as a home builders' showroom with model kitchens, bathrooms and other room layouts. Lead by local contractor Jerome Bigelow, a group of 13 owners optimistically launched the operation with a grand party attended by hundreds of Rochester business leaders. It had 59 people on staff working for a variety of construction-related businesses. The last occupants moved out in April 2012.

Event Studio LLC, of Rochester, then bought the unique complex from Partnership 10, of Byron, in 2013 for $1.3 million. Event Studio lists Rochester developer Dan Penz as manager on its incorporation documents.

Then in 2014, WSN began the search for a larger space in Rochester.

"We looked at lot of different buildings all around the city. We really like this building," Carlson said. "We liked the exposure. We liked the location and the ability to have our whole team in one spot."