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110 posts categorized "Non-profits news"

March 19, 2014

Flamingos + Elks = Bingo

After months of waiting, a Rochester nonprofit finally has scored permission to move to a new home.

Flamingo Bingo, which raises money for the Rochester Senior Center, has been given the green light by the Minnesota Gambling Control Board to move into the Elks Lodge 1091 at 1652 U.S. 52 North in the Hillcrest Shopping Center.

FlamingobingoIt's moving out of its long-time leased home at 2828 U.S. 52 North, which was sold to Luther Automotive Group in January.

Deb Nusbaum, Flamingo Bingo's charitable gaming manager, says the bingo center will call its final game at its current site at 1 p.m. on March 30. Then, Nusbaum and her team of 16 employees will move the operation.

She plans to kick off the new round of games at the Elks Lodge on April 4. Work on the new Flamingo Bingo site is underway.

The Elks Lodge members are very positive about bringing Flamingo Bingo into its facility, according to the club president.

"It's multi-faceted for us," said Chris Holloway, when the plan first was announced in December. "We have an excess of space that we don't use on a daily basis. We're both charitable organizations. There's a lot of crossover in our clientele. Plus it brings in additional revenue."

ElkslodgeNow that the move is in motion, the question is what will happen to the 42-year-old building where Flamingo Bingo has been been based since it opened in 2007.

Twin Cities-based Luther Automotive bought the building for $950,000 on Jan. 17. Luther also owns the nearby Park Place Motors dealership on the same frontage road.

Luther's Linda McGinty said the company does not have a specific plan for the site yet.

McGinty, director of real estate and development at Luther Automotive Group, declined to discuss whether its possible plans could include an expansion of Park Place Motors or possibly bringing a new dealership into the market.

However, she did acknowledge that Luther will "probably eventually remove the building."

March 03, 2014

Mayo Clinic to expand Superior Drive Support Center

Mayo Clinic is planning to expand its Superior Drive Support Center, which houses Mayo Medical Laboratories.

The clinic submitted plans on Feb. 14 to build a proposed 66,000-square-foot, two-story addition on the south side of the complex at 3050 Superior Drive N.W. 

03032014mayomedlabsMML conducts a wide variety of medical tests for hospitals worldwide. According to its website,
it performs nearly 20 million tests for more than 4,000 hospitals annually. The testing division overall has more than 3,200 employees, including more than 160 physicians and scientists. It has 58 laboratories that perform testing with support from Mayo Clinic physicians.

03032014SDSCplansWhile Mayo Clinic spokesperson confirmed the existence of site development application, officials there say it's too early to discuss specifics such as the timeline for the project or estimated cost. However, the plans designed by Flad Architects offer general details.

The expansion will more than double the lab space in the complex. It currently has 30,854 square feet of labs. The plans show that 34,000 square feet of laboratory area in the proposed addition to bring the total lab space to a total of 65,000 square feet.

Office space in the SDSC is slated to grow by 5,472 square feet, for a total of 137,000 square feet of space, following the expansion.

The remainder of the 26,000 square feet in the proposed expansion is described only as "Other." The first floor of the addition will have 28,533 square feet, and the second level will have 27,842.

Mayo Clinic moved into the 13-year-old complex in 2004. By 2011, approximately 800 employees worked at the facility. It was originally built by electronics manufacturer Celestica Inc. in 2001. When that company closed its Rochester operation, the building was left empty.

While Mayo Clinic leased the property for eight years, it purchased it for $18.5 million in August of 2012. Prior to that it was owned by 17 national investors through Triple Net Properties of Santa Ana, Calif. until they defaulted on the mortgage in 2012.  The investors bought the property for $36.8 million in 2006

When the mortgage defaulted, HSBC Bank USA took over the property. HSCB then sold it to Mayo Clinic.

While it was was originally under construction, New York City-based W. P. Carey & Co. LLC bought the complex from Celestica, which leased it back. W.P. Carey later sold it for about 70 percent more than the $21.6 million it paid for it.

December 10, 2013

Mayo Clinic wraps up $10 million buy of old courthouse site

Amid the boom in downtown development and the flurry of Destination Medical Center activity, a sale of a historic Rochester property has wrapped up after 20 years.

Mayo Clinic now officially owns the former Olmsted County Courthouse property after making the last payment of a $10.1 million, 20 year Contract for Deed deal.

The final payment was made on Sept. 1 to complete the agreement that was originally signed between the Mayo Foundation and Olmsted County in October 1993, according to Kelley Luckstein of Mayo Clinic.Get_photo

Mayo Clinic spent $7.7 million to renovate the courthouse into what is now the Ozmun office buildings at 515 Second St. The revamped complex was dedicated in 1995. The property also includes the Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center at 565 First St. S.W.

The buildings and property on Second Street Southwest became available after the then-new City-county Government Center at 151 Fourth St. S.E. was dedicated in 1993.

After paying $1 down as earnest money, Mayo Clinic made payments to the county every Sept. 1. The first installment was $1,031,946 and then the payment increased by one dollar for the next four years.

By the fifth year, the payment grew to $1,216,807 for five years. It increased to $1,401,665 on year 11 and the annual remained at that level through the final payment.

The original deal was made by the Mayo Foundation, but that entity has since been converted into the Mayo Clinic legal body, says Luckstein. On Nov. 19, the ownership was transferred from the foundation to Mayo Clinic.

December 06, 2013

Two Rochester nonprofit "animals" may move in together

Two of Rochester's nonprofit "animals," Flamingo Bingo and the Elks Lodge 1091, are looking to possibly move in together in early 2014.

Both organizations have generally agreed on a plan to have Flamingo Bingo move into the Elk's large Lodge Room at 1652 U.S. 52 North in the Hillcrest Shopping Center.

However, no lease has been signed yet. The proposed project is subject to the final approval from the state, which is needed before anything happens.

Flamingobingo"Both organizations are very excited about this," says Deb Nusbaum, Flaming Bingo's charitable gaming manager.  "We anticipate that we'll eventually be moving there, but there are a lot of details to work through yet with the Minnesota Gambling Control Board."

Flamingo Bingo, which raises money for the Rochester Senior Center, has called games at 2828 U.S. 52 North since it opened in 2007. It is now looking for a new home due to coming changes to its building, which previously housed Circus World bingo.

Nusbaum stressed that Flamingo Bingo is open for business at its current spot along U.S. 52 North and will remain so until it moves, probably in early 2014.

Flamingo Bingo's fund raising efforts are "critical" to supporting the Rochester Senior Center, she says. It's annual financial goal, which it met in 2012, is to raise at least $100,000 for the senior center, according to Nusbaum. The bingo parlor has 16 employees on staff.

For their part, the Elks members see a lot of benefits in bringing Flamingo Bingo into its facility.

"It's multi-faceted for us," says Chris Holloway, the current club president. "We have an excess of space that we don't use on a daily basis. We're both charitable organizations. There's a lot of crossover in our clientele. Plus it brings in additional revenue."

December 05, 2013

Breast cancer scanner maker, once linked to Mayo Clinic, sold to Mexican company

Qg3q4q112233Here's a potentially interesting nugget of news about San Diego-based Naviscan Inc., which was at one pointed linked with Mayo Clinic through intellectual property licenses as well as direct investment by Mayo Medical Ventures.

"… Certain Naviscan Inc. assets including intellectual property and the Naviscan Trademark" have been aquired by a Mexican medical scanner company called Compañía Mexicana de Radiología or CMR.

Not sure what that means exactly, but my guess is that CMR is now behind the steering wheel at Naviscan.

Now I don't know if Mayo Clinic still has any links with Naviscan, but it certainly did at one time. I've got calls into Mayo and Naviscan to check on that.

I wrote the Mayo Clinic-Naviscan relationship back in 2005 through 2007 or so. Sheesh, I've been doing this for a long time.

From back in November 2005:

Naviscan “entered into an agreement with Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (Mayo Clinic) to clinically validate and commercialize a dynamic patented molecular imaging agent for use with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and other imaging modalities. … Mayo Clinic has licensed the vitamin B-12 molecular imaging agent technology invented by Dr. Douglas A.Collins to Naviscan PET Systems, Inc and will receive royalties from this license. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have published studies that cancers have high uptake of radioactive B-12, especially in breast tumors."

    --------------------
"The combination of the Mayo Clinic’s patented Vitamin B-12 molecular imaging agent and Naviscan’s high-resolution PET scanner holds great promise for the future in terms of early detection of breast cancers,” said Paul Grayson, newly-appointed CEO of Naviscan PET Systems, Inc. and a Managing Director of Sanderling Ventures. “We sought out Naviscan’s technology to strategically invest in this important imaging technology platform.” Naviscan is planning clinical trial work with Mayo Clinic and other luminary sites in the U.S. to prove the value of the PEM Flex in breast cancer patients, as well as for evaluating PEM’s role with high-risk patients.”

----

From the same date in 2005:

“Naviscan PET Systems has raised a $6.5 million in Series B funding for its high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) products. The firm said that it raised the round from Sanderling Ventures, with participation from Mayo Medical Ventures."

FYI, Sanderling Ventures now leases a space in the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator.

November 11, 2013

Mayo Clinic, U of M startup ready for software rollout

Rochester's Evidentia Health got some press last week about its impending rollout at Fairview Health Systems.

Evidentia Health was one of the first tenants of Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator when it opened early this year.

Its billed as a health care IT company with licensed expe02272013mayoaccelerator1rtise and medical content from both Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota

It was co-founded by Mayo Clinic's Dr. Jeremy Friese in early 2012.Friese, an interventional radiologist, is the medical director for new ventures and business development in the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine.

Evidentia was profiled on Wednesday by TechdotMN, a non-profit business media group. Here's some from that piece by Yael Grauer:

As new provisions from the Affordable Healthcare Act take effect, Minnesota startup Evidentia Health is poised to help patients better understand their electronic health records (EHRs) while helping physicians meet criteria for “meaningful use” of EHR technology to improve patient care.

To receive EHR incentive pay under Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, healthcare providers must show they are meaningfully using EHRs by meeting various objectives.  Patients are required to be able to access their medical information within three days of when it’s created, and in 2014, this will be within one day.

The problem is that viewing EHR material and doing research online can be confusing to patients. They can jump to the wrong conclusions, worry unnecessarily and often have questions for their care team that may not be applicable.

Evidentia provides reports to both patients and physicians. The reports for patients include the most important sources of information, as well as secondary information for those interested in even more. In addition to the material in patient reports, physicians also receive recent medical research for evidence-based medicine studies.

----

Founded in October 2012, Evidentia is funded by Mayo Clinic Ventures and the University of Minnesota. A pilot program is taking place at the Family Practice Internal Medicine groups in Rochester, and Evidentia is prepared to deploy within Fairview at University Hospital.

As new provisions from the Affordable Healthcare Act take effect, Minnesota startup Evidentia Health is poised to help patients better understand their electronic health records (EHRs) while helping physicians meet criteria for “meaningful use” of EHR technology to improve patient care.

To receive EHR incentive pay under Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, healthcare providers must show they are meaningfully using EHRs by meeting various objectives.  Patients are required to be able to access their medical information within three days of when it’s created, and in 2014, this will be within one day.

The problem is that viewing EHR material and doing research online can be confusing to patients. They can jump to the wrong conclusions, worry unnecessarily and often have questions for their care team that may not be applicable.

Evidentia provides reports to both patients and physicians. The reports for patients include the most important sources of information, as well as secondary information for those interested in even more. In addition to the material in patient reports, physicians also receive recent medical research for evidence-based medicine studies.

“Evidentia brings together all of the information that you need to know and get it in your hands in a way that’s both credible and trustworthy, has been reviewed by physicians, and is applicable to your situation,” says CTO Brent Backhaus.

When patients access their electronic medical records, they’ve often confused about certain key phrases or conditions. Evidentia looks at the text of the reports, highlights key phrases, and presents individualized information to the patient. The information selected is both algorithmically selected and reviewed by a physician.

“We pick information to present to both to the patient and the physician that make the most sense for them to see at that point in time about their specific condition,” Backhaus says.

In addition to Backhaus, who was the founding CTO of Virtual Radiologic, Evidentia’s team includes CEO Jeremy Friese, a Harvard MBA and Associate Chair of Radiology at Mayo Clinic, and chief product officer Dan Steinberger, a U of M physician and technology leader, and founder of ProVation Medical (which had a $100m exit in 2006).

Founded in October 2012, Evidentia is funded by Mayo Clinic Ventures and the University of Minnesota. A pilot program is taking place at the Family Practice Internal Medicine groups in Rochester, and Evidentia is prepared to deploy within Fairview at University Hospital.

- See more at: http://tech.mn/news/2013/11/06/evidentia-health-mayo-clinic-ventures/#sthash.tL8tSBOX.dpuf
Yael Grauer
Yael Grauer
Yael Grauer
Yael Grauer

As new provisions from the Affordable Healthcare Act take effect, Minnesota startup Evidentia Health is poised to help patients better understand their electronic health records (EHRs) while helping physicians meet criteria for “meaningful use” of EHR technology to improve patient care.

To receive EHR incentive pay under Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, healthcare providers must show they are meaningfully using EHRs by meeting various objectives.  Patients are required to be able to access their medical information within three days of when it’s created, and in 2014, this will be within one day.

The problem is that viewing EHR material and doing research online can be confusing to patients. They can jump to the wrong conclusions, worry unnecessarily and often have questions for their care team that may not be applicable.

Evidentia provides reports to both patients and physicians. The reports for patients include the most important sources of information, as well as secondary information for those interested in even more. In addition to the material in patient reports, physicians also receive recent medical research for evidence-based medicine studies.

“Evidentia brings together all of the information that you need to know and get it in your hands in a way that’s both credible and trustworthy, has been reviewed by physicians, and is applicable to your situation,” says CTO Brent Backhaus.

When patients access their electronic medical records, they’ve often confused about certain key phrases or conditions. Evidentia looks at the text of the reports, highlights key phrases, and presents individualized information to the patient. The information selected is both algorithmically selected and reviewed by a physician.

“We pick information to present to both to the patient and the physician that make the most sense for them to see at that point in time about their specific condition,” Backhaus says.

In addition to Backhaus, who was the founding CTO of Virtual Radiologic, Evidentia’s team includes CEO Jeremy Friese, a Harvard MBA and Associate Chair of Radiology at Mayo Clinic, and chief product officer Dan Steinberger, a U of M physician and technology leader, and founder of ProVation Medical (which had a $100m exit in 2006).

Founded in October 2012, Evidentia is funded by Mayo Clinic Ventures and the University of Minnesota. A pilot program is taking place at the Family Practice Internal Medicine groups in Rochester, and Evidentia is prepared to deploy within Fairview at University Hospital.

- See more at: http://tech.mn/news/2013/11/06/evidentia-health-mayo-clinic-ventures/#sthash.tL8tSBOX.dpufis it will roll out its technology this year.

May 09, 2013

Not Westminster, but CeleBARK promises fun for dogs, familes

When the contests include worst doggy breath and owner/pet lookalikes, you know it isn't the Westminster Dog Show.

50edebd513994.imageHowever, you can bet your last collar that Saturday's CeleBARK Your Dog Day in the "backyard" of Rochester's Eagle Club will be a lot more fun for both pets and their families.

Pam Miller, owner of the mobile Bone Appetit Canine Bakery Unleashed, is sponsoring the family-friendly event to honor beloved dogs of all kinds, even those that might have a bit of halitosis. People are encouraged to bring well-behaved dogs that are up-to-date on their vaccinations.

Look for local celebrity judges Marcia Fritzmeier and Dr. Vicki Hunt to brave the bad breath, measure the longest ears and select the most similar dog/owner pair.

Fritzmeier is the handler of Mayo Clinic's popular therapy dog, Dr. Jack. Likewise, Hunt works with the therapy dog, Hershey. Hershey is known "Mr. June" from his appearance in the Rescued Dogs Calendar put out by Paws and Claws.

To help mark the first anniversary of the mobile version of her gourmet dog treat business, Miller wanted to host a fun and different kind of bash.

"I'd like it to become kind of a signature event," she says.

For the humans, both young and old, there will be games, contests, demonstrations and food. There even will be a treasure hunt similar to the Rochesterfest Medallion Hunt.

While fun is a big part of the fest by Bear Creek, it also will be about helping dogs find homes with good families.

"Part of my passion is to try and help rescue groups with their mission," says Miller.

Six rescue groups from Southeastern Minnesota will show off dogs available for adoption, as well as raise money to support their organizations.

While Miller has been locally-known for her homemade, preservative-free dog treats, she began driving her canine bakery and dog accessories shop on wheels to Rochester dog parks last summer.

"We go where the dogs and their owners are," she said.

Miller prides herself on offering the most current and unique products for dogs and the people who love them.

She says CeleBARK is just another way to help her business stand out from the pack.

Woof.

Tag: Columnist, blogger and reporter Jeff Kiger tracks business action in Rochester and southeastern Minnesota every day in Heard on the Street.
Infobox headline: CeleBARK Your Dog Day
Infobox text: BACB Unleashed is sponsoring the free event. which is open to families and their well-behaved dogs.

• Saturday.

• From 11 a.m. to  2 p.m.

• Behind the Eagles Club at 917 15th Ave S.E. in Rochester.

For more information, go to www.BACBunleashed.com.

February 28, 2013

Mayo Clinic adds DC/NYC PR firm to rachet up 'thought leadership'

Vt-brothers-3colInteresting. It looks like Mayo Clinic is contracting a high-powered PR firm, Widmeyer Communications, to promote public appearances on a national stage for CEO Dr. John Noseworthy and other Mayo Clinic leaders.

Actually, Mayo doesn't call it promote. They say 'thought leadership.' I'm not certain exactly what that entails. I don't believe surgery is involved, but I could be wrong. Heh.

I should point out that I'm very impressed by Mayo Clinic's in-house communications team in Rochester. Very sharp, efficient and GadeChris06A_NEWprofessional people as well as patient with annoying journalists. I'm not sure what Widemeyer can do that they can't. I guess we'll find out.

Here's some from a PRWeek article by Virgil Dickson that quotes Mayo Clinic's Chris Gade. I remember way back when Chris was merely a spokesman.

“We're an organization with a 150-year history in medicine, medical research, and education. As healthcare continues to change, we want to continue to be a resource for healthcare in the nation and around the world,” said Chris Gade, chair of the division of external relations at Mayo Clinic. “One way to do that is identifying the appropriate forums and places for thought leadership.

Mayo hired Widmeyer based on work it did for other clients. The contract is for one year. Gade declined to disclose the firm's budget.

February 27, 2013

A window on Mayo Clinic's business accelerator plans

It is getting close to the big reveal of the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator in the City of Rochester's Minnesota BioBusiness Center.

02272013mayoaccelerator1The plan, as I understand it, is to announce the new tenants - possibly eight - in the 2,500-square-foot center at RAEDI's annual meeting on Thursday. Remember this new twist on a business incubator is designed to house early biotech start-ups as well as venture capitalists. The tenant names have been kept hidden from anyone outside of Mayo Clinic and the usual insider crowd of public figures.

And yet this morning, a couple of venture capitalist firms' names are as clear as glass as being part of this private/public project.

Sanderling Ventures and Versant Ventures are up on the window, along with Mayo Clinic Ventures, the City of Rochester and RAEDI.

The California-based firm has a lot of experience working with Mayo Clinic and Mayo-related companies, like Torax and Naviscan.

02272013mayoaccelerator2I don't know as much as about Versant Ventures, but it is also based in California. However, it also has an office in Minneapolis.

Here's some background on the accelerator:

Mayo Clinic is giving $100,000 to turn the unused space, which is owned by the city, into offices. RAEDI will handle the management and leasing of the space.

HGA, which was the architect firm for the building, handled designs for this space. Lots of glass walls, I hear. Rents are expected to range from $13 to $15 per square foot.

February 22, 2013

Highlights of Mayo Clinic's 2012 financials

Here are a few random, fun facts from Mayo Clinic's 2012 financials:

-----------

800px-Gonda_building,_closer_up• Spent on charity care: $83.4 million, up from $61.8 million in 2011.

• Spent to support Medicaid: $321.7 million, up from $260.4 million in 2011.

• Revenue from retail pharmacy sales: $149 million, up from $134 million in 2011.

• Revenue from technology commercialization, health information and medical products: $34.1 million, down from $40.4 million in 2011.

• Revenue from cafeteria sales: $28.8 million, down from $30.3 million in 2011.

• Cash and cash equivalents: $59.6 million, down from $141.3 million in 2011

• Earned incentive from federal government for introducing electronic medical records: $44.7 million