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894 posts categorized "Mayo Clinic"

September 12, 2016

Mayo Clinic buys 2 Rochester properties for total of $10.2 million

Sold-signMayo Clinic must have had some money burning a hole in its pocket on Sept. 1.

On that day, Mayo Clinic bought a northwest Rochester building for $10 million and a house in southwest Rochester for $217,000.

I'm waiting for response from Mayo Clinic about their plans for those buildings. I should have more soon.

September 09, 2016

Foreign patient numbers trending down at Mayo Clinic


I'm wading through a 216 page statement Mayo-clinic-logo for issuance of $220  million bonds by the City of Rochester for Mayo Clinic.

While that might not sound very exciting, there are a lot of interesting details. This document is looked at bond buyers who are judging Mayo Clinic's stability.

Here's one thing that jumped out at me:

Foreign patients, not including Canadians, accounted for 1 percent of the patient population in Rochester in 2013.

That dropped to .03 percent in 2014 and 2015.

I don't know how many patients that accounts for or why the numbers are down. Plus I don't know if t
hat trend is continuing in 2016. I have submitted those questions to Mayo Clinic.

I realize this is a random fact, but it interests me. And there there a lot more little tidbits like this in the bond statement.

 

August 26, 2016

Mayo Clinic employment numbers are up and down

The number of Mayo Clinic employees has swung dramatically up and down since the passage of the Destination Medical Center legislation. 
 
Mayo-clinic-logoOn Thursday, Mayo Clinic leaders touted Rochester job growth to the Destination Medical Center Corp. board, saying the clinic has added 3,370 new positions in the last 12 months. However, that growth didn't quite carry the clinic's Rochester employee numbers out of the low point they were in last year.

"We are growing," said Jeff Bolton, Mayo Clinic's chief administrative officer and chairman of the Destination Medical Center Economic Development Agency Board. "Mayo is all in and committed." 

Bolton said Mayo Clinic had 34,175 employees in Rochester at the end of July. That is an increase of 3,370 jobs from the low point of 30,805 Rochester employees in August 2015.

While Mayo Clinic is adding local jobs, its employment numbers still are well below the 34,562 employees the Rochester clinic recorded at the end of 2015.

The figures show that 3,390 jobs were lost in 2015 between January to July. Then the numbers rose 3,757 by the end of December.

"It’s difficult to point out any trends in a 12-month cycle," Mayo Clinic spokesman Karl Oestreich said via email. "Mayo Clinic usually experiences about an average 2 percent annual growth. This rate varies each year — some years (like last year) more and other years less. Last year’s growth is ahead of that clip."

During his report to the board, Bolton said the increase in the past 12 months is because of patient demand being "extremely strong." He cited that new jobs are "a broad range of positions."

When asked what the average salaries are for the new jobs and what type of jobs they are, Mayo Clinic did not have that information available.

"We haven't done that analysis as to what job codes comprised most of the new/incremental positions. Good question, but unfortunately we don’t have a quick answer," Oestreich said. 

The DMCC board was impressed by Mayo Clinic's Rochester employment increases.

"We're asked all the time about what is going on in Rochester. We may not be doing too much on the brick and mortar, but you're on track," said board member and former Wells Fargo Minnesota CEO Jim Campbell. "You got about 10 percent in a year, which is pretty incredible job growth in the state. You have to be almost at the top."

After the meeting, State Sen. Dave Senjem proudly shared the employment numbers on his Facebook page.

"Quietly done without boasting or fanfare. Pretty amazing, more to come," he wrote.

At the end of his report, Bolton emphasized that Mayo Clinic is growing in Rochester as part of the DMC pact with the state.

"We're extremely bullish," he said. "We're really enjoying the opportunity to partner with the EDA, the city, the county and state in realizing the vision of DMC."


Mayo Clinic employees

in Rochester


• 34,175 - July 2016

• 34,562 - December 2015

• 30,805 - August 2015

• 34,200 - December 2014

• 33,197 - December 2013

• 34,223 - December 2012

• 33,156 - December 2011

• 31,998 - December 2010

• 31,966 - December 2009

 

August 23, 2016

Mayo's Noseworthy vs Cleveland Clinic's Consgrove

While Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic vie for the top doctors and patients, their respective CEOs are also being compared.

Here's the breakdown of how Mayo Clinic's Dr. John Noseworthy and Cleveland's Dr. Toby Cosgrove have scored in Modern Healthcare's annual "Top 100 Influential People" list plus the salaries they were paid each year.


Rank in 2011
* Noseworthy - 71, earned $2 million
* Cosgrove - 56, earned $2.5 million

Rank in 2012
* Noseworthy - 17, earned $1.7 milion
* Cosgrove - 21, earned $3.1 million

Rank in 2013
* Noseworthy - 15, earned $1.9 million
* Cosgrove - 16, earned $3.2 million

Rank in 2014
* Noseworthy - 16, earned $2.3 million 
* Cosgrove - 72, earned $4.1 million

Rank in 2015
* Noseworthy - 8
* Cosgrove - 12

Rank in 2016
* Noseworthy - 30
* Cosgrove - 29

 

August 16, 2016

New biz incubator is up and running

08152016collider1The renovation of the 115-year-old Conley-Maass building at 14 Fourth St. SW by owners Traci and Hunter Downs is almost complete

The Bleu Duck Kitchen on the main level of the building is ready to open to the public next week.

0816collider2Meanwhile, upstairs, the Downs' new Collider business incubator is officially open for business under the management of Jamie Sundsbak. About one-third of the works spaces are contracted out so far, he said.

On Monday's opening day, Chris Lukenbill moved in his software development teams, which works for Bright Agrotech of Laramie, Wyo.

July 07, 2016

Broadway Flashback - early 2013 Broadway at Center plan

Following Wednesday's announcement about the delay in the financing for the now-$145 million Broadway at Center project, I decided to look at back an earlier version of that project rolled out by Titan Development and Investments in 2013.

Here's an article I filed on May 31, 2013 with an assist from Managing Editor Jay Furst. The rendering is of the version of Broadway at Center introduced at Titan's press conference:

Just a week after Mayo's Destination Medical Center plan was approved by the state, a Rochester developer announced plans today for a 25-story tower at the corner of South Broadway and East Center Street.

6a00d83451cc8269e2019102c4aed3970c-800wiThe Broadway at Center mixed-use project, proposed by Andy Chafoulias' Titan Development and Investments, would have about 30,000 square feet of Class A office space, a 150-room four-star hotel, 150 market-rent apartments, a "high-end grocery" and a Minnesota-branded steakhouse, among other attractions.

The announcement was made at a news conference this morning at Titan's offices in the Minnesota Biobusiness Center. Chafoulias didn't attend; the announcement was made by John Beltz, vice president of brand revenue development.

Titan is "poised for some very significant growth and contributions to Rochester," Beltz said, citing the company's planned restaurant and entertainment complex three blocks south at the C.O. Brown building site and a seniors apartment project further north on Broadway.

No cost estimate was provided for the Broadway at Center tower, and Beltz said the tower could go higher as planning proceeds -- possibly topping the Broadway Residences and Suites tower next door, which is the tallest building in Rochester and southern Minnesota. As planned, the building would have about 300,000 square feet of space and would be connected to the skyway system and a planned city parking ramp on the block.

The new building would be on the northwest corner of the block bounded by South Broadway, East Center Street, First Street Southeast and First Avenue Southeast. The Broadway Residence and Suites tower is on the southwest corner, and the new project would be on the current site of CJ's Midtown Lounge, Jakobson Management Co. and Ginny's Fine Fabrics.

The goal is to have a "hole in the ground" and construction underway next year, Beltz said. He declined to identify the hotel, restaurant and retail tenants who are in discussions with Titan but said in a news release that they're "finalizing negotiations with several recognizable Minnesota brands."

Rochester's lack of a top-tier hotel brand was often cited during the DMC legislative process as something the city needs to attract national and international medical visitors.

The announcement signals Andy Chafoulias taking the wheel of a project envisioned by his father, Rochester developer Gus Chafoulias, in 2007. That proposal was for a two-tower mixed-use project with retail, apartments and office space as well as possible space for University of Minnesota Rochester.

As with the previous version, Rochester architect Hal Henderson of HGA Architects and Engineers would direct the project design. Darren Schlapkohl, Titan vice president of development and construction management, said the project has "been in design for some time and continues to evolve."

Mayo's DMC initiative, which was announced in January and won legislative approval less than two weeks ago, is "an excellent addition to the vision" for Rochester, Beltz said, but Henderson said the Broadway at Center project has been at an advanced stage for at least six months.

June 29, 2016

Mayo Clinic tech doesn't fare well in Celyad/Cardio3 study

Sometimes lost opportunities are actually positive things. 
 
The City of Rochester really wanted rock star Belgium biotech Celyad/ Cardio3 to build a manufacturing facility here to handle the Mayo Clinic-created C-Cure stem cell cardiac treatment.
 
CelyadThat fell apart, when Celyad/Cardio3 pulled out of its plan to take over the fifth floor of the Minnesota Buiobusiness Center.
 
However, this week that looks like a good thing. Rochester make have ducked being stuck with a half built facility after the results of the latest study of C-Cure.
 
A Chart 1 Phase 3 study found that no difference between patients treated with the C-Cure and those given a placebo.
 
Here's how an article on the Seeking Alpha investment news site described the situation:
 

The failure of a pivotal trial of its heart failure cell therapy C-Cure, erased 38% from the Belgian company’s valuation this afternoon, an outcome that will make its search for a partner considerably harder.

Indeed, without a partner the project is effectively dead, as Celyad confirmed today that it would not conduct further clinical work alone.

------

The Chart-1 phase III study failed to show this: it recruited 271 patients with chronic advanced symptomatic heart failure, and compared C-Cure against sham treatment. The primary endpoint was a composite of mortality, morbidity, quality of life, six-minute-walk test and left ventricular structure and function at 39 weeks, and on this measure C-Cure patients failed to show any difference versus placebo.

 
That must be pretty disappointing after nine years of promising results.
 
 Celyad/Cardio3 licensed stem-cell research by Mayo Clinic's Dr. Andre Terzic and Dr. Atta Behfar in 2007. It was called Cardio3 Biosciences back then. They have collaborated for years on the cardiopoiesis technology the company uses to repair patients' hearts by re-programming their own stem cells to regenerate cardiac tissue. Mayo Clinic owned 2.69 percent of Celyad as of March 3, 2015.
 
However, Celayd bought an NKR-T cell platform from Celdara Medical in 2015. It appeared that the company very quickly turned away from C-Cure to focus on the new area. That is looking like the saving grace for Celyad today.
 

 All of which would have been disastrous if not for the presence of its fledgling immuno-oncology pipeline, which no doubt prevented an even bigger share price collapse.

-----

Further data updates are expected in the coming months, and indeed this afternoon Celyad’s chief executive, Christian Homsy, ended a conference call discussing the C-Cure results by flagging approaching good news in oncology. Given the relatively small amount paid to access this technology and the huge hopes for the adoptive T-cell space, investors could indeed soon forget the C-Cure failure.

June 27, 2016

Mayo Clinic announces Transplant Genomics deal

It looks like Mayo Clinic is joining forces with a Pleasanton, Calif.-based (previously of Massachusetts) firm to bolster its genetic testing to predict the success of organ transplants.

Logo-2-ret1Here's the vague description of the deal announced in a general press release this morning:

 

Transplant Genomics Inc. is collaborating with the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine to develop, validate and commercialize diagnostic tests enabling personalized immunosuppression for solid organ transplant recipients. This multiyear collaboration includes an assessment of TGI's TruGraf test for renal transplant monitoring, a Mayo Clinic investment in TGI, and the co-development of new tests and technologies for additional targets, including exploratory studies in heart and liver transplantation.

This seems like this could be an interesting project. I wonder how long Mayo Clinic has been working with Transplant Genomics. 

It also would be fascinating to know how much Mayo Clinic is investing in TGI as well as how long this "multiyear" deal is slated to last.

 

 

 

June 13, 2016

Future use of ex-postal center still unclear

Almost a year since buying a former Med City mail processing center for $2.11 million, Mayo Clinic still is working out what to do with it.

3939Valleyhigh DriveMayo Clinic purchased the former U.S. Postal Service facility at 3939 Valleyhigh Drive in July 2015. The 72,662-square-foot center closed in January 2015, when mail processing was transferred to the Twin Cities.

When asked this week about its plan, the Mayo Clinic was pretty much the same as when it bought the building.

“No decisions have been made regarding the use of space at 3939 Valleyhigh Drive NW,” wrote Kelley Luckstein of Mayo Clinic Public Affairs on Friday in response to the query about the building.

The 19-year-old building could be adapted for a variety of purposes, such as an industrial laundry, a distribution center or light manufacturing. The center is described as "constructed of pre-stressed concrete and steel frames for high volume load distribution and contains a total of 23 dock doors; 10 overhead doors, 12 semi-truck docks and one grade door." 

 

June 07, 2016

For $300,000 upfront fee, Mayo Clinic licences cancer vaccine technology