News Business Sports Entertainment Life Obituaries Opinion
Jobs Homes Cars Classifieds Shopping
Local Bloggers Cheap Tech Eco-Confessions Faceoff Furst Draft Heard on the Street Med City Movie Guy Pulse on Health Political Party

Search PB Blogs

Loading

Categories

867 posts categorized "Mayo Clinic"

July 23, 2015

Quiet period to end for Celyad (former Cardio3) on July 29

Here's an interesting update from a site called Marketbeat.com about the former Cardio3, now trading in U.S. as Celyad. This Belgium firm has deep ties to Mayo Clinic and will soon occupy an entire floor of the Minnesota Biobusiness Center in downtown Rochester.

 Celyad SA’s  quiet period is set to expire on Wednesday, July 29th. Celyad SA had issued 1,460,000 shares in its initial public offering on June 19th, Market Beat reports.

CelyadThe total size of the offering was $100,097,600 based on an initial share price of $68.56. During Celyad SA’s quiet period, insiders and underwriters involved in the IPO are restricted from issuing any research reports or earnings estimates for the company because of SEC regulations. Following the expiration of the company’s quiet period, it’s expected that the brokerages that served as underwriters on the stock will initiate research coverage on the company.

 

CYAD has been the subject of a number of recent recent research reports. Analysts at Piper Jaffray initiated coverage on shares of Celyad SA in a research note on Tuesday, July 14th. They set an “overweight” rating and a $95.00 price target on the stock. Separately, analysts at Maxim Group reiterated a “buy” rating on shares of Celyad SA in a research note on Sunday, June 21st.

Celyad SA remained flat at $60.44 during during mid-day trading trading on Wednesday. 126 shares of the company’s stock traded hands. Celyad SA has a one year low of $47.52 and a one year high of $67.94. The stock’s 50-day moving average is $54.65 and its 200-day moving average is $54.65.

 

July 14, 2015

Piper Jaffrey gives Celyad (former Cardio3) stock positive rating

Here's an interesting item that floated into my email box this a.m. about the former Cardio3, now trading in U.S. as Celyad. This Belgium firm has deep ties to Mayo Clinic and will soon occupy an entire floor of the Minnesota Biobusiness Center in downtown Rochester.

By the way, a rating of "overweight" is a good thing. It means the stock is a better value that other stocks in the same sector.

Here's the item as posted by Piper Jaffray:

Piper Jaffray initiates coverage on Celyad SA with a Overweight rating and a price target of $95.00.

Analyst Edward Tenthoff commented, "Celyad is a leading cell therapy company. CelyadCelyad is conducting the Phase III CHART-1 trial of autologous cell therapy C-CURE in heart failure patients with data likely next summer. The company will initiate the CHART-2 trial this year with data in 2017. Celyad recently in-licensed novel CAR-T technology for cancer currently in a Phase I AML and multiple myeloma study. Celyad is listed on the EuroNext exchange in Brussels and Paris, and just completed a U.S. IPO issuing 1.46 million shares at US$68.56 raising gross proceed of US$101 million. CYAD shares have sold off since the IPO providing an attractive entry point at US$54.71, in our view. We are initiating coverage with an Overweight rating and US$95 price target."

Shares of Celyad SA closed at $54.71 yesterday.

 

 

June 15, 2015

Former Cardio3 launching $99 million IPO in US and worldwide

Celyad, formerly Cardio3 Biosciences, announced the terms for its $99 million stock offering this morning.

The Belgium-based Celyad, which is building a manufacturing facility in downtown Rochester and has close ties with Mayo Clinic, hopes to raise $99 million by offering 1.4 million shares at $70.98 per share.

CelyadWhile Celyad has traded on the European stock markets of NYSE Euronext Brussels and NYSE Euronext Paris for some time, this stock offering would introduce the regenerative medicine firm directly to the U.S. market. It has applied to make the U.S. offering on the Nasdaq stock market under the symbol CYAD.

A registration statement relating to these securities has been filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission but has not yet become effective. It cannot sell or accept offers to buy until the SEC OKs the registration.

This move could benefit Mayo Clinic, which owned 2.69 percent of Celyad as of March 3. Mayo Clinic first acquired equity in Cardio3 in 2007, when it licensed stem-cell research by Mayo Clinic's Dr. Andre Terzic and Dr. Atta Behfar. Its cardiopoiesis technology repairs patients' hearts by re-programming their own stem cells to regenerate cardiac tissue.

Earlier this year, the Rochester City Council recently approved a lease for Celyad to take over the entire fifth floor of Rochester's Minnesota BioBusiness Center. Rochester Area Economic Development Inc. and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development also are involved in the deal.

Celyad is building a prototype manufacturing facility in the 14,963-square-feet of space on the fifth floor of the downtown building. Mayo, which leases the fourth through eighth floors, moved its employees out of the fifth floor earlier this year. The five-year lease calls for it to pay a rent of $18 per square foot, or $22,444.50, per month. The city agreed in the lease to pay for $600,000 in equipment and improvements to the space.

DEED is offering Ceylad a $357,000 Minnesota Job Creation Fund award if it invests $1.5 million in Rochester within a year and hires 33 employees within two years. The average wages of the new jobs will be $21.52 per hour.

May 28, 2015

Mayo hires consultant to map out Discovery Square

To help fire up Discovery Square as "a catalyst" to create jobs in downtown Rochester, Mayo Clinic has contracted a feasibility study, independent of the Destination Medical Center Corp.

Mayo Clinic has hired the DMC development manager, Hammes Co. of Madison, Wis., to analyze the Discovery Square piece of the DMC vision and offer a market plan of how DiscoverySquarethe medical and technology research area might be developed. Mayo is paying Hammes $1.5 million to conduct the study, which is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

One expected tenant is Epic, a Madison-based software system that recently signed a contract to help build an electronic health record system for Mayo Clinic. It's planning on having many employees based in Rochester.

"They've indicated a strong interest in the Discovery Square concept, and we're exploring ways they may participate in that," said Bolton.

Discovery Square is described as "the focal point" for Mayo Clinic's expansion of its science and technology institutes, and it's designed as a place for private companies and others to work with Mayo on research and other projects. It's marked on the DMC map as being central to the Gonda Building and the Mayo Medical School.

"The Square is designed to be playful and artful, similar to the Google Commons in order to, quite simply, attract the best and the brightest, the most creative minds in the world," according to the DMC plan.

Mayo Clinic owns about 35 percent of the property within the proposed Discovery Square area.

The goal of the new study is to map out the area more specifically and identify potential partners and funding streams to make it sustainable.

Jeff Bolton, Mayo's chief administrative officer and the chair of DMC's Economic Development Agency, said Mayo funded the study because it's not part of the DMC EDA's scope.

"The EDA budget is really to provide staffing to support the DMCC board, to work with developers and help market the DMC concept," he said. "Mayo Clinic views this as area where we could serve as an important catalyst to advance the DMC vision. That's why we stepped up and are making this investment."

Mayo Clinic's relationship with Hammes dates back to the very early days of the DMC concept in 2008 before it became public. Mayo Clinic first officially contracted with the company about DMC in 2011. When the EDA signed its own contract with Hammes last year for $2.3 million a year, it had no ongoing Mayo contracts.

Bob Dunn, president of Hammes, explained that this study will be similar to his company's work on the overall DMC plan but will be much more detailed.

This study will include a master plan, a conceptual design, preliminary engineering, financial analysis, financing plan, a market analysis, a review of effective land use and operational aspects for Discovery Square.

"This will be a block-by-block plan," he said. "But we're not starting at ground zero. Mayo, which owns a good portion of the land in Discovery Square, has already thought a lot about this development."

Meanwhile, Mayo is actively working with companies to try to get them to locate there, Bolton said.

"We're out marketing the concept," said Mayo's Bolton. "Obviously, we have an interest in terms of attracting groups to collaborate with us."

The project's success likely will be driven by what partners want to work with Mayo Clinic.

"If I were to forecast, I'd say there will be multiple of owners of facilities in Discovery Square. Many will probably be owned by private developers," predicted Bolton. "There won't be a monolithic owner of the facilities. The free market will play out in this environment."

He added that Mayo Clinic may participate "directly or indirectly" in some of the development.

The multimillion dollar question is when actual development of this new job generator area will begin.

"We'll need a critical mass of corporate engagement in order to have a developer to put that first shovel in the ground," said Bolton.

Dunn said this is a fascinating feature of what is already a unique project.

"DMC and Discovery Square, to me, is one of the most interesting things that I can think of nationally in terms of major economic development," he said. "It's unique because impact Mayo Clinic can bring to something like this in a market that's now beginning to mature and evolve very quickly."

May 05, 2015

Tech security chief leaves Mayo Clinic for new job

Mayo Clinic's chief information security officer is leaving Rochester to join a Colorado technology firm.

3a01a19James Carder made the announcement on Twitter Tuesday saying, "It's with mixed emotions to announce that I have officially left Mayo Clinic and taken a new role as CISO (chief information security officer) @LogRhythm & VP of @LogRhythmLabs."

Carder was Mayo's technology security chief from June 2013 until this week. Described as "a frequent speaker at industry events and noted author of several security publications," Carder managed the security of the 250,000 to 300,000 devices connected to Mayo Clinic's network, according to the Wall Street Journal.

While at Mayo Clinic, the Wall Street Journal said he also created "an incident response infrastructure" and as well as Mayo Clinic’s first cyber threat intelligence organization.

At LogRhythm, Carder will serve as the chief information security officer and vice president of LogRhythm Labs. The Boulder, Colo.-based firm stated in the announcement of the hiring that Carder will set "the vision for and direct the company’s global information security program." He will manage 12 employees.

Carder told the Wall Street Journal that his primary reason for the move is "speed."

“The main difference is that things you do have a ripple effect quickly,” he explained to the WSJ.

April 22, 2015

Mayo Clinic to expand Saint Marys power plant

As part of Mayo Clinic's ongoing growth in Rochester, work has started on a project to expand the Saint Marys Campus' power plant. St_Marys_Hospital,_Rochester,_stone_marker

“The project will include a 5,000-square-foot addition onto the south side of the power plant at the Saint Marys Campus to increase plant cooling capacity," according to Kelley Luckstein, of Mayo Clinic.

The addition is needed to create space for a chiller and associated pumps and piping.

Grading for the project began recently. Luckstein estimates it will be completed by February 2016.

April 06, 2015

Mayo Clinic's Noseworthy makes top physicians list, though down from 2014

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy made Modern Healthcare magazine's 2015 list of most influential physicians, though he dropped down four places from the previous year.

Noseworthy was ranked at 6th in the 11th annual 50 Most  influential Physician Executives and Leaders. That's up from down from his previous ranking of second in the 2014 and 2013 lists. He was listed at 11th in 2011 and 31st in 2010. He was named president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in 2009.

Noseworthy-730The magazine describes the criteria of making the 50 Most Influential Physician Executives and Leaders list as "physicians working in the healthcare industry who are deemed by their peers and an expert panel to be the most influential in terms of demonstrating leadership and impact."

In recent years, Noseworthy has also made the magazine's annual list of 100 most influential people in healthcare. In 2014, he was ranked at No. 16. That list typically comes out in August.

That list also included the salaries of the leaders. The 63-year-old Noseworthy's salary was $1.75 million in 2012. It increased to $1.9 million in 2013.

The leaders of Mayo Clinic's perennial competitors, Cleveland Clinic and John Hopkins, also made the 2015 influential physicians list. However, they were much further down than Noseworthy. Cleveland Clinic's CEO Delos “Toby” Cosgrove was listed at 13th and Johns Hopkins Medicine CEO Paul Rothman came in at number 20.

Modern Healthcare named Dr. Robert Wachter as the most influential physician in 2015. He's the chief of the medical service at University of California San Francisco Medical Center and chief of the division of hospital medicine.

Richard Gilfillan, president and CEO of Trinity Health in Livonia, Mich., was ranked second. The Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Thomas Frieden, was third.

April 04, 2015

Rutgers hires away Mayo Medical School dean

Remember Dr. Frank Cockerill, the former CEO of the for-profit (and wildly profitable) Get_photo Mayo Medical Labs? Mayo Clinic accused the well-respected and long-time Mayo exec of taking trade secrets and misrepresenting his departure from Mayo as a retirement.

He took a job at Quest Diagnostics, a competitor of the successful Mayo Medical Labs. Mayo Clinic sued and eventually Cockerill resigned from his new position at Quest.

Cockerill's wife, Sherine Gabriel, is the dean of the Mayo Medical School. Now she's in the news by being hired away by Rutgers.

Rutgers seems particularly gleeful about being able to "steal people from the Mayo Clinic."

Here's a staff and wire story on this:

----------------------------------

The dean of the Mayo Medical School in Rochester has been hired as the new dean of Rutgers University's Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

Gabriel orig C hi resSherine Gabriel, 57, will take over as head of the New Brunswick, N.J.,-based medical school in August, Rutgers officials announced, according to NJ Advance Media.

"Rutgers can now steal people from the Mayo Clinic," Brian Strom, chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, said when he announced the appointment to the university's board of governors Thursday.

Gabriel has worked at the Mayo Clinic for nearly 30 years, serving as a professor of medicine and epidemiology and as a federally-funded researcher of rheumatic diseases.

She will be paid $560,000 a year at Rutgers, a university spokesman said. That will make her one of the highest-paid administrators at the state university, according to the NJ Advance Media article.

Medical school deans are traditionally one of the highest-paid academic positions at universities and their salaries have been rising, the NJ Advance Media article says.

This year, the median salary for medical school deans is $492,213 nationwide and $525,966 at research universities, according to a survey by the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources, a national group that tracks salaries.

Rutgers acquired two medical schools — Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and New Jersey Medical School in Newark — when it took over most of the former schools of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey in 2013.

Gabriel was selected as dean of Robert Wood Johnson Medical School after a national search.

"Our search committee recognized the combination of assets that Sherine Gabriel brings," Strom said. "She has exceptional strengths in medical school education administration and instruction. In addition, she is a noted researcher with a strong background in research administration and has played significant roles in the success of Mayo Clinic's business development activities."

Gabriel has been dean of the Mayo Medical School since 2012.

As a researcher, she has focused on the risks of connective tissue diseases among women with breast implants, as well as studies on rheumatic diseases and the economic impact of rheumatoid arthritis.

April 02, 2015

Cardio3 announces plans for IPO in the U.S.

Cardio3 Biosciences, the Belgium-based biotech firm building a manufacturing facility in downtown Rochester, has announced plans to issue stock in the U.S. Logo cardio 3

Cardio3 BioSciences, which works closely with Mayo Clinic and has its U.S. headquarters in Boston, Mass., confidentially filed  "a draft registration statement" with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission this  week about its intention.

The eight-year-old regenerative medicine company  is already publicly listed on the European stock markets of NYSE Euronext Brussels and NYSE Euronext Paris. However, issuing an IPO in the U.S. would significantly boost its finances and garner the firm a lot more attention.

Such a move could benefit Mayo Clinic, which owned 2.69 percent of Cardio3, as of March 3. Mayo Clinic first acquired equity in Cardio3  in 2007, when it licensed stem cell research by Mayo Clinic's Dr. Andre Terzic and Dr. Atta Behfar. Its cardiopoiesis technology repairs patients' hearts by re-programming their own stem cell to regenerate cardiac tissue.

This week's  statement stressed that the possibility of a Cardio3 IPO is still in the very early stages.

"The timing, number of shares and price of the proposed offering have not yet been determined," according to the firm.

This filing follows last week's financial report that showed it lost $18.1 million in 2014, up from the $15.9 million it lost in 2013.

That annual report also highlighted "a non-exclusive preferred access agreement" signed with Mayo Clinic in October that cleared the way for Cardio3 to build a facility in the City of Rochester's Minnesota BioBusiness Center building.

"With this agreement, Cardio3 BioSciences agreed to give preferred consideration for Rochester, Minnesota to the U.S. to build a manufacturing facility for the production of C-Cure, at a facility located adjacent to the campus of the Mayo Clinic, and the Mayo Clinic agreed to periodically review with Cardio3 BioSciences its portfolio of regenerative medicine technologies, including in the areas of cardiology and oncology, with a view towards future potential licensing," according to the Cardio3 report.

March 26, 2015

Cardio3 reports losing $18 million in 2014

Cardio3 released a financial report today with a lot of interesting tidbits like it's building in the Minnesota BioBusiness Center due to an agreement with Mayo Clinic.

Also it's developing a U.S. headquarters… in Boston.

Here's most of my article on this:

The Belgium-based biotech firm building a manufacturing facility in downtown Rochester reported today that it lost $18.1 million in 2014, up from the $15.9 milCardiobioscience_jpeglion it lost in 2013.

Cardio3 BioSciences, which works closely with Mayo Clinic and is taking over the fifth floor of the Minnesota BioBusiness Center, reported its financials for 2014, plus some highlights of its activities in 2015.

Cardio3 is publicly listed on the European stock markets of NYSE Euronext Brussels and NYSE Euronext Paris, although it is not traded publicly in the United States.

Mayo Clinic owned 2.69 percent of Cardio3, as of March 3. Mayo Clinic first acquired equity in Cardio3 in 2007, when it licensed stem cell research by Mayo Clinic's Dr. Andre Terzic and Dr. Atta Behfar. Its cardiopoiesis technology repairs patients' hearts by re-programming their own stem cell to regenerate cardiac tissue.

6a00d83451cc8269e201a511d8e824970c-250wiThe Hong Kong-based Medisun, which is opening an office in Rochester, owned 7.2 percent of Cardio3 on March 3.

In the years since 2007, Mayo Clinic has developed a close working relationship with the Belgian company. Mayo Clinic is participating the U.S. clinical trial of Cardio3.

"We made significant strategic, operational and financial advancements in 2014 as we seek to build C3BS into a global specialty therapeutics company," stated Cardio3 CEO Dr. Christian Homsy in the announcement.

The annual report highlighted "a non-exclusive preferred access agreement" signed with Mayo Clinic in October that cleared the way for Cardio3 to build a facility in the City of Rochester's BioBusiness Center building.

"With this agreement, Cardio3 BioSciences agreed to give preferred consideration for Rochester, Minnesota to the U.S. to build a manufacturing facility for the production of C-Cure, at a facility located adjacent to the campus of the Mayo Clinic, and the Mayo Clinic agreed to periodically review with Cardio3 BioSciences its portfolio of regenerative medicine technologies, including in the areas of cardiology and oncology, with a view towards future potential licensing," according to the Cardio3 report.

Cardio3's prototype manufacturing facility will occupy the 14,963-square-feet of space on the fifth floor of the downtown building. Mayo, which leases the fourth through eighth floors, moved its employees out of the fifth floor earlier this year. Cardio3's five-year lease calls for it to pay a rent of $18 per square foot, or $22,444.50, per month. The city agreed to pay for $600,000 in equipment and improvements to the space.

The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development also agreed to give Cardio3 a Minnesota Job Creation Fund award of $357,000, if the company invests $1.5 million in Rochester within a year and hires 33 employees within two years.

The ultimate goal of this project is for the city and RAEDI to eventually convince Cardio3 to build a 100,000-square-foot manufacturing facility with 350 employees in Rochester, according to officials at RAEDI.

However, Rochester is not the only city wooing the Belgium company. While the Rochester facility is Cardio3's first official U.S. location, the company's report show that it also has plans to build a U.S. headquarters in Boston, Mass.
-------

The company also reported that it's re-stating its 2013 financial reports "to reflect errors" found by PriceWaterhouseCoopers.

"After due consideration with its auditors, we decided that the shareholders convertible loans should have been accounted for as a financial debt instead of equity (previously called 'quasi equity') as originally posted in our 2013 financial statements, because the loans were convertible into a variable number of shares," according to today's statement from the company.