News Business Sports Entertainment Life Obituaries Opinion
Jobs Homes Cars Classifieds Shopping

Search PB Blogs



22 posts categorized "List mania"

October 07, 2015

The 5 top Rochester real estate sales in 2015 so far

• $15 million - Maplewood Square sold on Sept. 29.

Sold_sign• $10 millionMiracle Mile shopping center sold on May 15.

• $7.2 million - The Hampton Inn at 1755 S. Broadway sold on Feb. 6.

• $5.4 million - Former Menards store at 5150 U.S. 52 North sold on March 17.

• $4.5 million - Prosthetic Laboratories center at 121 23 Ave. S.W. sold on Jan. 30. 

July 28, 2015

Mayo Clinic-linked NeoChord on 'Hot Devices We Can't Get in US' list

NeoChord, a medical device firm I first wrote about in 2007, made a top 10 list this week on the Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry news site.

They posted a "10 Hot Devices We can't Get in the US" list on their Device Talk blog with this set-up text block:

Patients in the United States enjoy some of the best medical care in the world, but many observers worry that the country's regulatory environment is pushing medical innovation to other shores. Whether you believe FDA oversight is too stringent, too lax, or strikes the right balance, there are numerous medical devices that have achieved CE Marking, but aren't yet FDA approved.

NeoChord's DS1000 made the list. It earned a CE Marking in December 2012 but does not have FDA approval.


The Eden Prairie-based NeoChord surfaced locally in 2007, when it licensed technology designed byMayo Clinic cardiac surgeons Dr. Richard Daly and Dr. Giovanni Speziali. Speziali was named as the company's chief medical officer in 2013. 

NeoChord-DS1000Beside licensing its technology, Mayo Clinic has also previously invested in NeoChord. 

The NeoChord DS1000 device is used to treat a heart condition called mitral regurgitation. Mitral regurgitation means the valve or leaflet that controls the flow of blood from the left atrium to the left ventricle is not working properly.

Treatment typically consists of “cracking the chest,” stopping the heart and doing surgery. NeoChord's approach is much less invasive and can be done on a beating heart.

A tool is inserted between the ribs and into the heart. Then it is used to attach a chord to the faulty valve leaflet, which is tethered to the heart.

The market for less invasive techniques for mitral valve repair has been estimated at more than $2 billion. 

April 06, 2015

Mayo Clinic's Noseworthy makes top physicians list, though down from 2014

Mayo Clinic CEO Dr. John Noseworthy made Modern Healthcare magazine's 2015 list of most influential physicians, though he dropped down four places from the previous year.

Noseworthy was ranked at 6th in the 11th annual 50 Most  influential Physician Executives and Leaders. That's up from down from his previous ranking of second in the 2014 and 2013 lists. He was listed at 11th in 2011 and 31st in 2010. He was named president and CEO of Mayo Clinic in 2009.

Noseworthy-730The magazine describes the criteria of making the 50 Most Influential Physician Executives and Leaders list as "physicians working in the healthcare industry who are deemed by their peers and an expert panel to be the most influential in terms of demonstrating leadership and impact."

In recent years, Noseworthy has also made the magazine's annual list of 100 most influential people in healthcare. In 2014, he was ranked at No. 16. That list typically comes out in August.

That list also included the salaries of the leaders. The 63-year-old Noseworthy's salary was $1.75 million in 2012. It increased to $1.9 million in 2013.

The leaders of Mayo Clinic's perennial competitors, Cleveland Clinic and John Hopkins, also made the 2015 influential physicians list. However, they were much further down than Noseworthy. Cleveland Clinic's CEO Delos “Toby” Cosgrove was listed at 13th and Johns Hopkins Medicine CEO Paul Rothman came in at number 20.

Modern Healthcare named Dr. Robert Wachter as the most influential physician in 2015. He's the chief of the medical service at University of California San Francisco Medical Center and chief of the division of hospital medicine.

Richard Gilfillan, president and CEO of Trinity Health in Livonia, Mich., was ranked second. The Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Thomas Frieden, was third.

March 06, 2015

10 years of blogging Rochester

On March 4, 2005, I wrote my first blog post. Kiger's Notebook blogo 2x

It was my sixth year at the Post-Bulletin. I created the "Heard on the Street" column about three years before the blog began. 

More  than 6,200 posts, stacks of columns, mountains of tweets and many gray hairs later, I'm still here writing about business and things vaguely related to businesPhoto on 2015-03-03 at 18.11s in southeastern Minnesota.

It'syou, the readers, who make this career such a fulfilling and entertaining one. Thank you everyone for your feedback, criticism and support over these past 10 years. 

10 years of blogging Rochester

On March 4, 2005, I wrote my first blog post.Kiger's Notebook blogo 2x

It was my siPhoto on 2015-03-03 at 18.11xth year at the Post-Bulletin. I created the "Heard on the Street" column about three years before the blog began. 

More than 6,200 posts, stacks of columns, mountains of tweets and many gray hairs later, I'm still here writing about business and things vaguely related to business in southeastern Minnesota.

It's you, the readers, who make this career such a fulfilling and entertaining one. Thank you everyone for your feedback, criticism and support over these past 10 years.  

January 02, 2015

Green Mill restaurant closes

About 40 people lost their jobs unexpectedly on New Year's Day when Rochester's Green Mill Restaurant closed after eight years of cooking on the northwest side.

02012015greenmillclosedThe staff reportedly was not given any notice of the closing until company executives showed up on Thursday. They posted letters on the restaurant's doors stating,"It saddens us to inform you that the Rochester Green Mill will be closing its doors January 1."

Calls to Paul Dzubnar, CEO of the St. Paul-based Green Mill, were not returned this morning.

Dzubnar personally owned the Rochester franchise under the corporate name of G M P Rochester LLC. Citing long interest from Rochester diners to have a Green Mill of their own, he built the 6,800-square-foot restaurant at 2723 Commerce Dr. N.W. in 2006. 

"It finally came together," said Dzubner, who was then a vice president of Green Mill.

The Rochester location seated 240 people and employed more than 100 staffers when it opened. It was built in a commercial development that was spearheaded by Merl and Dan Groteboer.

After the closing, Green Mill now has 27 locations in the Minnesota and Wisconsin region. The closest to Rochester is in Winona.

In 2011, Dzubnar launched a second line of restaurants called Crooked Pint Ale House. There now are locations in Apple Valley and Minneapolis. Twin Cities media has reported that deals to open more Crooked Pints in and outside of Minnesota are in the works.

November 08, 2014

Mayo Clinic docs make millions by consulting with drug/device companies

Here's some from the lead article in my package of stories about Mayo Clinic doctors and their financial relationships with drug/medical device companies in this weekend's Post-Bulletin.

FYI, the front page article is continued on page A2 and more articles and data are printed on page B4.

An unprecedented disclosure of payments from drug companies shows that $3.07 million for consulting was paid in 2,388 payments to Rochester-based Mayo Clinic researchers, doctors and hospitals during five months last year.

11082014drugmoneygraphicHowever, Mayo Clinic officials point out that they have a strict policy about such payments, which all must be approved by its Conflict of Interest Committee. Such policies, which many medical centers have, are a way of preventing medical professionals from being unduly influenced by money from drug companies in their decisions, such as what drugs they prescribe.

For the same period, Cleveland Clinic staff collected $4.3 million in private money for consulting, while Johns Hopkins Hospital employees took in a mere $4,627.

Dr. Richard Ehman, vice-chair of the Conflict of Interest Committee, said that Mayo Clinic's restrictive policies are unusual within the medical industry.

"We know all of the financial relationships of our staff. That's unheard of," said Ehman.

Cleveland Clinic and Johns Hopkins urge their employees to disclose their private contracts, though they stop short of requiring it in every case, according to their policies posted on their websites. Mayo, Cleveland and Johns Hopkins all agree that a physician or scientist serving as primary leader of a research project are banned from having private contracts with the companies involved.

800px-Gonda_building,_closer_upHundreds of Mayo Clinic doctors are receiving millions from drug companies and medical device makers for private consulting every year, while many others are paid one-third of the royalties generated by their work.

Disclosing all of the financial contracts between private companies and doctors is the goal of the Open Payments website run by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. It features a database of doctors and the money they receive from outside sources. It's now required by the Physician Payment Sunshine Act, which was part of the Affordable Care Act health reform.

In late September, data from August to December 2013 was released on the site. This batch of records includes about 4.4 million payments made to about 550,000 doctors and 1,360 teaching hospitals. However, some of the information reported by private companies is incomplete, confusing and, in some cases, incorrect.

For Mayo Clinic doctors, 100 percent of the payments for private consulting go directly to them. Mayo began allowing such consulting contracts in 1999, when it changed the rule that required all consulting payments to go to the clinic.

The payments for those five months show all different types, including royalties, research money and royalties.

In addition to the consulting payments during those five months, a total of 68 payments totaling $3.01 million were made to Mayo Clinic for research, according to the database.

All research money, like grants, goes directly to Mayo Clinic.

However, physicians or researchers receive one-third of the amount of royalty payments received by the clinic from drug companies, according to clinic policy. During the five months of reports, Mayo Clinic received a total of $1.9 million in royalties.

Just one company -- DePuy Synthes Sales Inc., a subsidiary of heath care giant Johnson & Johnson, reported paying a total of more than $1.15 million to Mayo Clinic or its doctors in 278 payments from August to December.

In the wake of the recent federally-mandated deluge of information about the financial ties between doctors and private drug/medical device companies, Ehman explained that Mayo Clinic does allow its employees to personally profit from such agreements. However, every financial relationship must be approved by the Conflict of Interest Committee.

Mayo Clinic approved 1,003 consulting contracts for 308 doctors and researchers in 2013 to personally work with private companies on their own time. The Mayo Clinic committee, which meets every other week, approved 953 such agreements with 301 individuals in 2012 and 1,071 for 292 employees in 2011.

February 22, 2013

Highlights of Mayo Clinic's 2012 financials

Here are a few random, fun facts from Mayo Clinic's 2012 financials:


800px-Gonda_building,_closer_up• Spent on charity care: $83.4 million, up from $61.8 million in 2011.

• Spent to support Medicaid: $321.7 million, up from $260.4 million in 2011.

• Revenue from retail pharmacy sales: $149 million, up from $134 million in 2011.

• Revenue from technology commercialization, health information and medical products: $34.1 million, down from $40.4 million in 2011.

• Revenue from cafeteria sales: $28.8 million, down from $30.3 million in 2011.

• Cash and cash equivalents: $59.6 million, down from $141.3 million in 2011

• Earned incentive from federal government for introducing electronic medical records: $44.7 million

August 28, 2012

Lunds/ Byerly's scouting state for new grocery locations

While Rochester has many grocery stores in the pipeline - Fareway, CostCo, People's Food Co-op and Hy-vee - there are a few chains, like Whole Foods, that local people seem to still want here.

Another grocery store chain that is often mentioned on local wish lists is Lunds/ Byerly's. It's a Minnesota company with 22 stores in the state, most in the Twin Cities area.

A recent posting on a national commercial real estate site could be good news for local fans of Lunds/Byerly's. The company is out and about shopping for new locations in Minnesota.


In their own words, Lunds/Byerly's describes what they are doing:

"Growth opportunities are sought throughout the existing market during the coming 18 months."

Now that "existing market" phrase could mean they are just looking in the Twin Cities-Land area.

Back in 2008, Lunds/Byerly's went on a similar shopping spree and they obviously skipped over Rochester then.

Jennifer Kent of Lund Holdings told me this back then, “We do understand there is a lot of interest to for us to come down to the Rochester area, but we are not quite ready to move that far out … of the Twin Cities area."

Of course, things can change. Rochester is larger now and is pegged as a growing and vibrant community in constrast to many other Minnesota cities.

So who knows? Maybe they'll give the Med City a closer look this time around. I probably should give Jennifer another call to check in.

Here's the posting from the Dealmakers commercial real estate site:

Lund Food Holdings, Inc. trades as Byerly’s and Lunds at 22 locations throughout MN. Lunds prefers to occupy spaces of 40,000 sq.ft. and Byerly’s prefers to occupy spaces of 60,000 sq.ft. in freestanding locations, strip centers and urban/downtown areas.  Typical leases run 20 years with options.

June 19, 2012

Big Blue tops world's fastest computer list with Roch. systems

Here's a little from my two lengthy stories in today's paper about IBM's rocket ride back to the top of the world's fastest super computer list and Rochester fueled it.

This is mainly focused on the Blue Gene/Q systems. I have more focusing on the new warm-water cooled SuperMUC system in another piece in print.

Ibm_sequoia_llnlAfter a few years in the middle of the supercomputing pack, Big Blue rocketed to the top spot by running a world record-breaking speed of 16.3 petaflops and capturing five of the top 10 rankings in the latest international list of top supercomputers.

And Rochester is in the driver's seat for this IBM resurgence.

"It's the Academy Awards of what we do. This is the thing you go after," says Andy Schram, the proud project executive for Blue Gene supercomputers in Rochester. "But it's not a beauty contest. You actually have to perform. They have to deliver value to the client."

The Rochester-made Blue Gene family of machines and the new water-cooled SuperMUC machine certainly delivered.

IBM-SuperMUC-cropped-proto-custom_28When the twice-annual Top 500 supercomputer list was unveiled Monday, IBM's Sequoia Blue Gene/Q machine roared into the top spot, past Fujitsu’s K Computer, which had held that ranking on the last two lists in November and June 2011.

Mira, another Blue Gene/Q, took third place with 8.1 petaflops. Two other Blue Gene/Qs were at Nos. 7 and 8; while the SuperMUC system was No. 4.

In all, 15 Blue Gene/Qs were ranked in the top 100. They were all designed, manufactured and tested by several hundred staffers in Rochester.