News Business Sports Entertainment Life Obituaries Opinion
Jobs Homes Cars Classifieds Shopping
Local Bloggers Cheap Tech Eco-Confessions Faceoff Furst Draft Heard on the Street Med City Movie Guy Pulse on Health Political Party

Search PB Blogs

Loading

Categories

62 posts categorized "Economic development"

August 14, 2015

South Dakota firm begins work on 192 apartments

Lots of dirt moving in northwest Rochester is a sign that work has started on a new, more than $20 million apartment complex.

South Dakota-based Stencil Homes is developing a two-building, 192-unit project called The Pines at Badger Hills. It's tucked away on Badger Hills Drive Northwest between the second and third roundabouts. That puts it just off of West Circle Drive and near the new Hy-Vee grocery store. A new roadway will connect The Pines with the new commercial development.

08132015thepinesonbadgerDeveloper and builder Nate Stencil describes The Pines as "a mix of market rate with one- and two-bedroom apartments." His goal is to have it open by summer 2016.

"This one is not a luxury project. It is a middle to upper, price-point-driven project," he said.

While Stencil only has been active in Rochester for a few years, he has a lot of projects in the works here.

"We've been pretty aggressive in the market. We've been able to make some good relationships there," he said. Stencil works closely with well-known Rochester Realtor Merl Groteboer.

The firm has two other Rochester apartment complexes — Nue52 and Kascade Place — under construction at Rochester's 65th Street Northwest interchange, across U.S. Highway 52 from the north Menards store.

Stencil expects Nue52, which has 83 units, to be ready to open within 60 days or so. Kascade Place, which will have 96 units, is expected to open in February or March.

Stencil Homes also has announced plans to build a $15 million, 110-unit apartment complex on the corner of Third Avenue Southeast and Fourth Street in downtown Rochester. That's across from the city-county Government Center. That project still is in the early planning stages.

More than 480 apartments might seem like a lot to have in the pipeline for Rochester, which has many other similar projects already in the works. However, Stencil isn't worried.

"There's a lot of pent-up demand there," he said. "I think everyone will be surprised how well the market there will handle adding a couple thousand units."

However, Stencil predicts The Pines will be the firm's last "suburban" or outlying Rochester development for a while.

"We feel strongly that there is more opportunity in the downtown area now. We have one other project we'll be doing in the urban core (in addition to the Fourth Street one)," he said.

Meanwhile, he's also moving quickly on another Minnesota project — revamping the former Pioneer Press building in downtown St. Paul. He recently purchased it and plans to convert it into 175 market-rate apartments.

August 10, 2015

TapImmune using Mayo Clinic tech for possible cancer vaccine

 

Assistant Manager Editor Mike Klein spotlighted a press announcement from a Seattle-based biotech company called TapImmune Inc. working with Mayo Clinic this morning.

I remember in 2010, when TapImmune first licensed Mayo Clinic technology and began collaborating with Mayo's world-renowned vaccine exTapimmunelogopert, Dr. Gregory Poland.

At that point, they were working with a Small Pox construct to create the vaccine for cancer as well as other infectious threats like, Ebola.

In May of this year, reports came out about Mayo Clinic's Dr. Edith Perez saying how this vaccine changed her view towards preventative medicine. She is working with TapImmune oon applying the vaccine to fight breast cancer.

TapImmune had only $142,000 in and $3.3 million in losses at that point in May.

This appears to be a promising company with deep ties to Mayo Clinic. It seems like a good candidate to based in Rochester rather than someplace like Seattle.

Here's some of what Klein filed on this for today's paper:

Seattle-based TapImmune Inc. has exercised its option agreement with Mayo Clinic to use its technology in a possible vaccine for certain types of cancer, it announced.

TapImmune signed a worldwide exclusive license agreement to commercialize a "proprietary folate receptor alpha vaccine technology for all cancer indications."

This technology, developed in the laboratory of Keith Knutson at Mayo, has successfully completed Phase I clinical trials in ovarian and triple-negative breast cancer. The trial demonstrated the experimental therapy was "safe, well-tolerated, provided a robust immune response," according to the news release. Next, TapImmune plans a Phase II clinical trial in the second half of the year.

TapImmune CEO Dr. Glynn Wilson said the company's future clinical programs will be "aimed at developing this leading vaccine candidate as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with other immunotherapies."

Mayo Clinic has a financial interest in the technology.

August 05, 2015

Insurer expands relationship with Mayo Clinic to bring more patients here

Two Minnesota health-care giants, Mayo Clinic and UnitedHealth Group, are joining forces to bring thousands of new patients to Rochester and other Mayo sites for treatment.

The Eden Prairie-based insurance provider UnitedHealth announced today it will recommend that patients with certain conditions travel to Mayo Clinic for care, through UnitedHealth's Optum Centers of Excellence Program.

800px-Gonda_building,_closer_upCompanies can sign up for coverage under the Centers of Excellence through UnitedHealth or directly through Optum. That means referring patients to designated sites, such as Mayo Clinic's campuses in Rochester, Florida and Arizona, for treatment. Participating in the program may include some coverage of travel and lodging costs.

Mayo Clinic has been listed by Optum as a Center for Excellence for organ transplants for 11 years. Optum says it makes more than 14,000 transplant referrals a year. Neither group said how many Optum organ transplant referrals come to Mayo Clinic each year.

Today's announcement adds the three Mayo Clinic locations to the list of preferred sites for treatment of cancer, heart failure, congenital heart disease, infertility and bariatric surgery.

“This expanded relationship with Mayo Clinic provides patients in participating health plans from around the country with greater access to clinically superior, cost-effective health care,” stated Mike Weissel of Optum Consumer Solutions in today's announcement.

Neither Mayo Clinic nor UnitedHealth released any estimates on how many more patients this might bring to Mayo Clinic or how much money it might bring in for Mayo Clinic. However, it clearly could be a great boon for the medical center and communities such as Rochester.

All of the new conditions added to list are major medical treatments. A look at just bariatric surgery shows the potential for growth. 

Mayo Clinic reports it performs more than 300 bariatric surgeries a year in Rochester. The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimated a total of 179,000 bariatric surgeries were performed in the U.S. in 2013.

Both Mayo and Optum stressed how this new relationship will benefit patients by providing "access to high-quality, cost-effective care."

“Health plans and employers know the value of sending patients with complex and or rare conditions to high-quality centers such as Mayo Clinic,” said Dr. Charles Rosen, Mayo Clinic's medical director of contracting and payer relations.

Today's announcement marks the latest collaboration between Mayo Clinic and UnitedHealth/ Optum. Earlier this year, Mayo Clinic announced its partnership with Optum360 for revenue management services.

In 2013, they launched "a strategic research alliance"  to create a state-of-the-art facility in Cambridge, Mass under the umbrella of OptumLabs. OptumLabs is a for-profit unit of UnitedHealthcare's Optum division, which earned $1.3 billion in 2011. 

The research facility today has 22 major corporate partners and has more than 100 studies in process.

July 23, 2015

Quiet period to end for Celyad (former Cardio3) on July 29

Here's an interesting update from a site called Marketbeat.com about the former Cardio3, now trading in U.S. as Celyad. This Belgium firm has deep ties to Mayo Clinic and will soon occupy an entire floor of the Minnesota Biobusiness Center in downtown Rochester.

 Celyad SA’s  quiet period is set to expire on Wednesday, July 29th. Celyad SA had issued 1,460,000 shares in its initial public offering on June 19th, Market Beat reports.

CelyadThe total size of the offering was $100,097,600 based on an initial share price of $68.56. During Celyad SA’s quiet period, insiders and underwriters involved in the IPO are restricted from issuing any research reports or earnings estimates for the company because of SEC regulations. Following the expiration of the company’s quiet period, it’s expected that the brokerages that served as underwriters on the stock will initiate research coverage on the company.

 

CYAD has been the subject of a number of recent recent research reports. Analysts at Piper Jaffray initiated coverage on shares of Celyad SA in a research note on Tuesday, July 14th. They set an “overweight” rating and a $95.00 price target on the stock. Separately, analysts at Maxim Group reiterated a “buy” rating on shares of Celyad SA in a research note on Sunday, June 21st.

Celyad SA remained flat at $60.44 during during mid-day trading trading on Wednesday. 126 shares of the company’s stock traded hands. Celyad SA has a one year low of $47.52 and a one year high of $67.94. The stock’s 50-day moving average is $54.65 and its 200-day moving average is $54.65.

 

July 22, 2015

Dirt is moving for NW Rochester development

Dirt is moving in northwest Rochester for a new commercial development area. 

Edina-based New Era Development is starting to prepare its Creekside Development on the southwest corner of the intersection of 19th Street Northwest and West Circle Drive. 

XAerial_-Creekside-2011.8.3-005-e1432657863387-750x410.jpg.pagespeed.ic.F6OkG5ifGbNo businesses have yet been announced for the build-to-suit development. Plans show an entrance from 19th Street Northwest and streets within the Creekside area.

The marketing brochure for Creekside lists the build-to-suit opportunities as including retail, office and flex office space. Available lot sizes range from 1.13 acre to 4.22 acres.

New Era first proposed Creekside in the fall of 2007, just before the economic recession. Earlier this year, the firm updated its plans and began marketing the project.

Plans show a development that could grow into something very similar to the 100-acre commercial area anchored by Costco, Associated Bank, Aldi and Kwik Trip on the northeast corner of the same intersection.

The Radichel family, of Mankato, which is behind Venstar LLC and its affiliate, New Era, has owned the land for about 30 years.

In 2007, former Venstar President Nino Pedrelli told the Rochester City Planning and Zoning Commission that, “We are long-term holders, and right now the project is a go for us."

Venstar and New Era also own the Valley High Business Center buildings, Phase I and Phase II, at 3535 40th Ave. NW, and the Cascade Park commercial center on Ninth Street Northwest, behind Kwik Trip. — Jeff Kiger

July 14, 2015

Piper Jaffrey gives Celyad (former Cardio3) stock positive rating

Here's an interesting item that floated into my email box this a.m. about the former Cardio3, now trading in U.S. as Celyad. This Belgium firm has deep ties to Mayo Clinic and will soon occupy an entire floor of the Minnesota Biobusiness Center in downtown Rochester.

By the way, a rating of "overweight" is a good thing. It means the stock is a better value that other stocks in the same sector.

Here's the item as posted by Piper Jaffray:

Piper Jaffray initiates coverage on Celyad SA with a Overweight rating and a price target of $95.00.

Analyst Edward Tenthoff commented, "Celyad is a leading cell therapy company. CelyadCelyad is conducting the Phase III CHART-1 trial of autologous cell therapy C-CURE in heart failure patients with data likely next summer. The company will initiate the CHART-2 trial this year with data in 2017. Celyad recently in-licensed novel CAR-T technology for cancer currently in a Phase I AML and multiple myeloma study. Celyad is listed on the EuroNext exchange in Brussels and Paris, and just completed a U.S. IPO issuing 1.46 million shares at US$68.56 raising gross proceed of US$101 million. CYAD shares have sold off since the IPO providing an attractive entry point at US$54.71, in our view. We are initiating coverage with an Overweight rating and US$95 price target."

Shares of Celyad SA closed at $54.71 yesterday.

 

 

Rochester engineering firm merges with Minneapolis company

A 14-year-old Rochester engineering firm is merging with a large Twin Cities-based company.

Structural Design Group officially will become part of Meyer Borgman Johnson on Wednesday, said Al Hiniker, who founded the well-known firm in 2001. Both focus solely on structural engineering, which is in great demand during Rochester's development boom.

FireShot Capture - Structural Engineer Rochester, MN - Structural Design Gr_ - http___www.sdgmn.com_Clients won't see any change with the five-person team at Structural Design's office at 3270 19th Street NW, though the name over the door will change to Meyer Borgman Johnson. Hiniker also will stay on as the managing principal of the office.

"This will give us a lot more resources we didn't have before," said Hiniker. "My goal has been to grow. And MBJ's goal has been to have a presence in Rochester. This accomplishes both. It's a win-win."

This will be MBJ's third Minnesota office. It also has locations in Green Bay, Wis. and Phoenix, Ariz. with a total of 80 employees on staff.

"We've had experience in Rochester for many years," said Jason Pederson, MBJ's managing director. "We recognize Rochester as a vibrant and growing marketplace, even beyond DMC (Destination Medical Center.)"

MBJ has worked on Rochester facilities including Mayo Clinic's Dan Abrahams Healthy Living Center and Titan Development'sH3 Plaza on South Broadway.

"I've known Al for quite a while. This seemed like a very natural conversation," said Pederson. "We're just delighted with this."

Hiniker recalled that "the seeds" of this deal began at least two years ago.

While many construction-related firms have acquired a foothold in Rochester with similar deals with local businesses, Structural Design and MBJ are unique in one way. Instead of offering services ranging from architecture to electrical engineering to landscaping, they both have a laser-like focus solely on structural engineering.

This merger follows several similar ones that have occurred, since Mayo Clinic's DMC initiative was announced.

Rochester's Allman & Associates, Inc., a mechanical and electrical engineering firm led by Jeff Allman, merged with LKPB Engineers in January. Yaggy Colby Associates merged with the larger Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc. last year. Rochester'sMcGhie & Betts Inc. merged Minneapolis-based WSB & Associates in 2013. Kane and Johnson Architects, a small firm with a 63-year history in Rochester and Austin, merged with Crookston-based Widseth Smith Nolting in 2014.

 

July 09, 2015

Development exploding in Rochester's Shoppes on Maine area

Downtown Rochester is not the only area being eyed by developers. 

It appears that Shoppes on Maine in south Rochester is exploding with development these days.

I wrote about a 211 apartment complex proposed for the area on Wednesday plus there's already a massive housing project called The Boulders already under construction, which will have 144 apartments and eight buildings with 10 townhouses in each.

FireShot Capture - Google Maps - https___www.google.com_maps_@43.9547185,-92.4647416,15zMeanwhile, yet another group of developers met with residents of the Maine Avenue neighborhood on Tuesday to discuss their plans for a 359 unit apartment complex slated the empty land across from Mills Fleet Farm store.

I don't know much about the Fleet Farm apartment complex yet, but should have more on it soon.

Beside more than 700 apartments, the buzz in the Shoppes on Maine is that a new car dealership could be revving up for the land around 48th Street and St. Bridget's Road. 

There is a lot of interest in real estate in that area right now, so it's possible that a new name might be on the road to join Rochester Toyota Scion and Mercedes Benz of Rochester in Shoppes on Maine.

June 15, 2015

Former Cardio3 launching $99 million IPO in US and worldwide

Celyad, formerly Cardio3 Biosciences, announced the terms for its $99 million stock offering this morning.

The Belgium-based Celyad, which is building a manufacturing facility in downtown Rochester and has close ties with Mayo Clinic, hopes to raise $99 million by offering 1.4 million shares at $70.98 per share.

CelyadWhile Celyad has traded on the European stock markets of NYSE Euronext Brussels and NYSE Euronext Paris for some time, this stock offering would introduce the regenerative medicine firm directly to the U.S. market. It has applied to make the U.S. offering on the Nasdaq stock market under the symbol CYAD.

A registration statement relating to these securities has been filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission but has not yet become effective. It cannot sell or accept offers to buy until the SEC OKs the registration.

This move could benefit Mayo Clinic, which owned 2.69 percent of Celyad as of March 3. Mayo Clinic first acquired equity in Cardio3 in 2007, when it licensed stem-cell research by Mayo Clinic's Dr. Andre Terzic and Dr. Atta Behfar. Its cardiopoiesis technology repairs patients' hearts by re-programming their own stem cells to regenerate cardiac tissue.

Earlier this year, the Rochester City Council recently approved a lease for Celyad to take over the entire fifth floor of Rochester's Minnesota BioBusiness Center. Rochester Area Economic Development Inc. and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development also are involved in the deal.

Celyad is building a prototype manufacturing facility in the 14,963-square-feet of space on the fifth floor of the downtown building. Mayo, which leases the fourth through eighth floors, moved its employees out of the fifth floor earlier this year. The five-year lease calls for it to pay a rent of $18 per square foot, or $22,444.50, per month. The city agreed in the lease to pay for $600,000 in equipment and improvements to the space.

DEED is offering Ceylad a $357,000 Minnesota Job Creation Fund award if it invests $1.5 million in Rochester within a year and hires 33 employees within two years. The average wages of the new jobs will be $21.52 per hour.

April 30, 2015

Lisa Clarke to officially become leader of DMC's EDA

More than a year after starting a national search for an executive director to lead the Destination Medical Center's Economic Development Agency, Mayo Clinic's Lisa Clarke has been hired to fill that role.

As DMC's board secretary and Mayo Clinic's Community Engagement head, Clarke has filled the interim role of leading the EDA from the organization's start.

The DMC group originally posted advertisements for the position in February 2014, in hopes of hiring someone by April of that year. This hiring is solely the responsibility of the EDA and doesn't involve the DMC Corp. board or the Rochester City Council.

Clarke previously described her role as the first executive director of the EDA as building the organization and creating the processes as well as getting approval of the DMC master plan. The next director has a different job ahead of them.

"The first full time executive director's role will be to execute the plan," she said. "The important thing is to get someone who has the experience in economic development and in development, in general. The most important thing is to get the right person with the right skill set."

While Lisa Clarke will step into the role of EDA director, she will remain connected to Mayo Clinic.

"The technical answer is that she's 100 percent an employee of the EDA," said Jeff Bolton, Mayo Clinic's Chief Administrative Officer and chair of the EDA . "However, we did not want her to lose the benefit of being a Mayo employee."

Bolton explained that all of the personnel costs related to Clarke will be covered by Mayo Clinic from that $585,000 annual contribution to the EDA.

"I'm part of the package," said Clarke with a grin.

When asked about Mayo Clinic's relationship with the EDA, Bolton said, "The EDA is a separate legal entity. It is separate from Mayo."

Clarke plans to set up an office for the EDA staff in the roughly 6,000-square-foot former Red Lobster space at 195 S. Broadway.

The space is on the street level of the 60-year-old Rosa Parks Pavilion building. Mayo bought the building for $2.37 million in 1997, and Red Lobster leased space there from 1987 until it closed in 2011 and opened in a new building by Apache Mall.

With the hiring of Clarke and the EDA moving into Mayo Clinic office, is Mayo Clinic concerned about the possible appearance that it is controlling the EDA?

"I do think the EDA an independent agency is the right approach, the right structure. This is a many part orchestra, if you will. I do see Mayo having one voice in this with the city, county  and the state," Bolton said. "I think there's a good separation without making it independent of the entire process. Everything is really tightly connected, really tightly coordinated."

Clarke echoed Bolton's sentiments about the relationship between Mayo and the EDA.

"It truly has been a very positive thing to have all of these players around the table to represent the diversity of the community and its diverse businesses with Mayo Clinic being the largest," she said.

Lisa Smith, the lieutenant governor of Minnesota and chair of the DMCCorp. board of directors said that Mayo's role is important to the big picture.

"From the perspective of the state, it's great to have a really, really strong anchored tenant in the private sector. We've got four strong partners with very specific ideas about moving this forward," she said. "There are a lot of strong opinions around the table. I think it works very well."