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7 posts categorized "Consignment news"

May 29, 2014

Second Salvation Army store to open

Rochester should have two Salvation Army thrift stores within a few months.

Work has started in a 1,400-square-foot space in the Slumberland Center at 4909 U.S. 52 North, along the frontage road, according to David Ferber, the local director of community engagement for the Salvation Army.

The space is being divided to set up a sales floor separated from the donation sorting area.

E06c662a-9cf7-4fa6-b6ed-565c49263db1The hope is to have it ready to open by late summer or more likely by early fall.

The Salvation Army is leasing the space from Lou Grimaldi, who owns Slumberland as well as the commercial space behind the store. It will be about half the size of the current south Rochester thrift store at 201 Ninth St. S.E., though it will offer the same mix of donated clothing, household goods, toys, books and more.

"We have been working on this for a while. We realized there was a need in Rochester for another store," Ferber said. "Our customers have told us that they want a northwest store."

He credited Grimaldi with helping to finally make this project a reality. While the location is not as visible as most traditional stores want, Ferber says it is a good fit for the Salvation Army.

"We're a destination. I think people will find us," he said.

The Salvation Army's thrift store always has been popular in Rochester, though it has been located in different spots.

Since 2006, the thrift store has been in its spot in the west end of the Kmart center. Its former building downtown now is used for its Caring Partners Adult Day Program.

In recent years, the resale market has grown in Rochester, with Savers, Goodwill and several private shops opening or expanding. That has served Salvation Army well, as more than 80 percent of the sale of each donated item is used to support Rochester programs.

"We have an amazingly generous community," said Brad Dahlke, who is assistant manager of the current store and will be in charge of the new north Rochester location.

Dahlke anticipates it will take about 15 to 18 employees to staff the new store. The current one has about 28 staffers.

He says Rochester always has responded well to the Salvation Army's store with donations as well as shoppers. Some frequent the store for its inexpensive basics. However, others shop like it's a "treasure hunt."

"Lots of antique dealers and collectors shop the store," Dahlke said.

While finding that valuable item is rare, it does happen occasionally. He recalled the story of a person who bought a dusty floor lamp for $5 and re-sold it for $5,600.

May 21, 2014

Mayo launching bioservices firm

Mayo Clinic has long processed and stored patient specimens for its own researchers.

Now it's packaging those services and others together to offer to outside clients via a new start-up company to be called Mayo Clinic Bioservices.

537cd487db2b9.image"Basically, we're taking advantage of some internal business that we've been doing for some time and now we're offering all of that externally to customers," explained Stephen Thibodeau, co-director of the Biorepositories Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

This new firm will allow Mayo Clinic to compete in a growing bio industry valued internationally in the billions.

He compared the business model to that used at Mayo Medical Labs, which tests patient sample for hospitals and researchers around the world. Mayo Clinic Biosciences won't run tests, though it will process, store and ship samples for its clients.

In addition to those services, it will also offer access to Mayo Clinic's Biobank. The Biobank features thousands of biological samples, such as blood, from healthy volunteers. Mayo Clinic has been collecting samples for seven years toward reaching a goal of 50,000 samples. Thibodeau estimates that the Biobank will finally reach that goal by June 2015.

The primary base for the new operation is being set up in the warehouse at 2915 Valleyhigh Dr. N.W., which Mayo Clinic bought in 2012. Some freezer units have already been installed and more construction to adapt the facility is underway. Thibodeau estimates that the facility will be ready this summer. Mayo Bioservices is expected to move in by August and have the operation running by September. It will also have satellite locations on Mayo Clinic's Florida and Arizona campuses.

Mayo Clinic currently supports the internal clinic sample processing and storage with a staff of about 70 employees, 50 of which work in Rochester.

"Initially, we expect to have a sufficient amount of staff. Though we do expect the business to grow over time and that we'll need to add more later," he said.

While it's not in operation yet, Mayo Clinic Bioservices has already signed up its first customer.Los Angles-based Sanguine recently signed up to have Mayo Clinic Bioservices process, store and ship biospecimens that Sanguine has collected for clients.

"We are excited about the pilot project with Mayo, not only because it increases the scalability of our business, but also because it allows individuals that have been on our waiting list to participate in the research and development of new treatments," stated Sanguine CEO Brian Neman in the annoucement. "Mayo Clinic Bioservices has tremendous infrastructure and processing capacity that will meet our existing needs while also offering the potential for future expansion."

The agreement between Mayo Clinic and Sanguine is a fee-per-service deal at this point, though they expect the business connection to deepen as time goes on.

"We hope to have a long-term relationship with Sanguine," according to Thibodeau. "Essentially, we're the laboratory arm of Sanguine."

May 15, 2014

A new play at Barlow Plaza for two local stores

Some changes are kicking around Rochester's Barlow Plaza for Once Upon A Child and Soccer Advantage.

Once Upon A Child, the "gently used" children's clothing and gear store, has moved over one space and expanded in the center's satellite building along Civic Center Drive Northwest.

05152014onceuponachildThe store, owned by Roger and Sue Mrugala, of Burnsville, has long been an anchor in shopping center. However, it was getting getting cramped in the space and couldn't carry all of the sizes that customers were requesting, according Jen Hatch of Once Upon A Child.

"So when we were given the chance to move to a larger spot, it was perfect for us," she said.

Once Upon, which was based on the north end of the building, moved south into the empty next-door storefront at 1111 Civic Center Drive N.W. Kelley's Quality Sewing Center previously was based there.

The children's clothing store upgraded from a 2,500-square-feet spot into a much a roomier 4,000-square-foot space, after the space was freshened up with new carpet, paint and other touches. It re-opened in the new spot earlier this month.

Hatch says the store is able to carry clothing up to size 16 now and they are able "to dabble in junior sizes." Plus the extra room, "makes the shopping experience more enjoyable for our customers."

Once Upon A Child's southern shift opened up its former spot for Soccer Advantage to make a move to Barlow Plaza from its current home at 3160 Wellner Drive N.E. The Rochester soccer-focused sporting goods shop is locally owned by Dean and Lynn Alcock.

The move will give it more space to play with, plus raise the five-year-old Soccer Advantage's visibility and access, say the Alcocks.

"Moving to a more central location in the city will be great for our customers," said Lynn Alcock.

Their goal is to move by the end of this month so they can be up and running by the time the World Cup soccer matches begin in June. Soccer Advantage will remain open on Wellner Drive until a day or two before making the move.

Dean Alcock, a soccer coach and retailer, says the additional room at the new site will hopefully allow the store to add big-name brands to its line-up of shoes, balls, jerseys and other gear.

"The look of the new store is going be one of the best in the Midwest," he said.

November 01, 2013

Karma Consignments closes Broadway shop to focus on 2nd St. shop

The owners of Karma Consignments are shifting their full attention to their huge, bright yellow store on Rochester's Second Street.

As part of that strategy, Dave Hatch and Janinne Casey, closed up their North Broadway shop for good this week.

"It's time to focus on our future rather than our past," says Hatch.  "We just don't have enough help to keep both open."

He and Casey originally opened Karma at 407 N. Broadway in fall 2011. Karma sells antiques, used furniture, collectibles and, as their name suggests, they also handle consignments.

"We were bursting at the seams there," he says.

That shouldn't be a problem in the 20,980-square-foot store at 1800 Second St. S.W. They also have a 6,000-square-foot building there. Both were used by Mackie's Home Furnishings until that long-time Rochester business closed earlier this year.

While Karma just opened at start of October, Hatch has already ratcheted up the Second Street store's curb appeal to the super nova level with a bright yellow and red paint job.

"I wanted something that grabbed your attention and slapped you in the face," he says.

Whether his exterior colors are actually slapping anyone around or not, Hatch says the new store is attracting between 80 to 300 shoppers a day.

Karma is looking to bring in even more people by adding vintage and consignment clothing to its mix of merchandise. That's only one of the big ideas that Hatch is cooking up.

"My ultimate goal is to be the Walmart of the antique and consignment world," he says.

October 29, 2013

Something new at The Old Rooster

After being in business for 28 years, something new will happen at a Rochester store that specializes in old things.

The Old Rooster Antique Mall at 106 N. Broadway will get a new owner on Friday, when Ron Ruport takes the reins of the business.

OldroosterRuport, who's a part owner of Mantorville Square Antiques in Mantorville, is buying The Old Rooster from Gordy and Virginia "Granny" Kranz.

The Kranzes opened the mall there in 1985. Prior to that, they owned antique malls in Mazeppa and other spots in Rochester's downtown. The Old Rooster name originated when the couple ran an antique mall in the former Richard's Roost restaurant building on First Street Southwest.

"I've known Gordy and Granny for a long time," says Ruport of how he came to buy the mall. "This mall gets good traffic, especially from Mayo Clinic patients."

The mall currently has 12 dealers with two more on their way. Ruport says that will still leave room for a couple more dealers.

While he has no big changes on the way, the new owner plans to freshen up the mall with touches like new paint. The major innovation he is bringing in is the capability to accept credit cards.

One thing won't change much and that's the Kranzes. While they won't be the mall owners, they aren't retiring, says Gordy Kranz. He and his wife will remain on as dealers in the mall.

Kranz, a retired Rochester police officer, says the many years running The Old Rooster have been good ones.

"We've got good dealers that price items fairly. We don't have any hot shots," he says. "It's been interesting. People come in, look around and find something they are looking for. Then they're happy. If they don't find anything, they still had fun looking and it didn't cost them anything."

September 11, 2013

Gagnon sculpture goes on sale

A bronze sculpture by internationally renowned local artist Charles E. Gagnon recently went on sale by consignment in downtown Rochester.

Cache_4084796136The sculpture, called "Dancer Stretching," is on display at John Hasseler's Broadway Jewelry & Visual Arts, 325 South Broadway. Gagnon, who died in 2012, is best known locally for his Peace Plaza fountain sculpture.

His widow is developing the Charles E. Gagnon Museum and Sculpture Garden in the late artist's southwest Rochester home.

The bronze on display at Broadway Jewelry is 15" by 14" wide and weighs about 25 pounds. The owner lives in Montana and originally bought it directly from Gagnon in 2000 for $27,000. The asking price on the piece is $33,000.

Gagnon broke the mold after casting, so there is only one such sculpture. However, the artist did also make a larger version of the sculpture.

Hasseler, a goldsmith and jewelry maker, opened Broadway Jewelry in early 2012. He carries many original pieces of art, jewelry and offers watch repair. His gallery has works by three other bronze artists on display as well as 30 other artists.

December 31, 2012

Kismet's winter break

Look for things to be quiet this January along the 600 block of North Broadway as the crew at Penny Bracken's three Kismet consignment fashion and home decor shops take a "deserved winter break" to prepare for the new year.
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Kismet fans shouldn't be worried though. The stretch of more than 10,000 square feet of quirky and cool consignment that some in Rochester call Penny Lane (Well, I do anyway. Heh) will come back to life again on Feb. 1.

Here's how Bracken describes Kismet's time off - "We may be hibernating but be assured we will be ready and raring to serve the consignment community when we start back up…"