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534 posts categorized "Biobiz news"

July 01, 2014

Mayo Clinic-linked Cardio3 making push into China

Cardio3 BioSciences, a Belgium company working closely with Mayo Clinic, recently launched a joint venture in China, the third largest pharmaceutical market in the world.

Cardiobioscience_jpegWorking with Hong Kong-based Medisun International Limited, it created Cardio3 BioSciences Asia Holdings Ltd. to make a serious push into China. As part of the deal, Medisun purchased $34 million in stock. It now owns 8 percent of the company's outstanding shares.

Cardio3 is publicly listed on the European stock markets NYSE Euronext Brussels and NYSE Euronext Paris, though it is not traded publicly in the U.S. Get_photo

The company says that $34 million will finance the U.S. clinical trials for C-Cure, Cardio3's regenerative heart treatment. Cardio3 CEO Dr. Christian Homsy flew to Rochester in January for a press conference at Mayo Clinic to announce that U.S. trial. Mayo Clinic in Rochester is one of the trial sites. Homsy gave a tentative time line of commercialization in Europe possibly by 2017 and by 2018 in the U.S.

Medisun has also committed to buy an additional $34 million shares of Cardio3 stock from existing shareholders in the next eight month at a price per share equivalent to the 10 days average preceding the offer.

This new deal means Medisun's ownership of Cardio3 has quickly leapfrogged Mayo Clinic's investment. As of June 16, Mayo Clinic owned 5.05 percent of the available shares of Cardio3. Medisun had just 4.21 percent at that point. As of June 25, Mayo Clinic controlled 3.1 percent of the shares.

Mayo Clinic researchers Dr. Andre Terzic and Dr. Atta Behfar originally developed the proprietary process of regenerating heart tissue with stem cells drawn from a patient's own bone marrow. Since 2007, Cardio3 has licensed patents and related research from Mayo Clinic. Terzic and Behfar each have a financial interest in the company.

Homsy has previously stated that he hopes to eventually base a few employees in Rochester for office and laboratory work. Cardio3 previously attempted to open a U.S. headquarters here, but that fizzled when the one person based here left.

Many consider what Cardio3 is attempting as the "holy grail" of cardiac treatments. Terzic previously described repairing faulty hearts as a "major unmet need worldwide." He estimated about one-third of all deaths stem from heart disease.

To date, the promising company has raised $121 million in equity and capital.

A recent study also estimated that the global market for such treatments could grow to $18.2 billion by 2019. The U.S. market was valued at $6.1 billion in 2012, with potential to increase to $8.49 billion by 2019.

“With this presence in Greater China, we are very proud to become the first global player in the field of cardiac regenerative medicines, aiming to commercialize our leading edge cell therapy to patients all across the globe,” stated Cardio Chairman Michel Lussier in the announcement of the venture.

Medisun Chairman Danny Wong says that his company is organizing medical conventions in August "to promote cell based medicines as well as Cardio3’s technology" in both Beijing and Shanghai.

"We are passionate about this project and I am certain that our involvement with Cardio3 as a leader in this field, combined with our local knowledge of the regulatory, healthcare and market access capabilities and expertise, will bring success to all the parties involved,” said Wong.

All the costs of Cardio3's moves in China will be funded by Medisun, with a minimum of $27 million committed during a three year period. Cardio 3 has 40 percent ownership in the joint venture, which will drop to 30 percent when clinical trials are up and running.

Success of the Phase III clinical trials that allow Cardio3 to market C-Cure in Asia would trigger  royalties ranging between 20 and 30 percent of net sales depending on total revenue of the joint venture.

June 25, 2014

Mayo Clinic-linked NeoChord gets new leader

An Eden Prairie company that makes a medical device based on Mayo Clinic research named a new leader this week for the first time since it launched in 2007.

NeoheartNeoChord announced that David H. Chung was appointed as president and CEO, "effective immediately." He replaced John Seaberg, who resigned.

“David Chung’s extensive experience in building and managing international sales forces will be invaluable, as we introduce NeoChord’s innovative technology to patients throughout Europe,” said Dr. Michael Fulton, Neochord's chairman of the board.

For the past seven years, the company has been developing a device designed by Mayo Clinic cardiac surgeons Dr. Richard Daly and Dr. Giovanni Speziali. Beside licensing its technology, Mayo Clinic also is invested in an equity position in the firm. Speziali was named as the company's chief medical officer in 2013.

The NeoChord DS1000 device is used to treat a heart condition called mitral regurgitation. Mitral regurgitation means the valve or leaflet that controls the flow of blood from the left atrium to the left ventricle is not working properly.

Portfolio-neochord-260x138Treatment typically consists of “cracking the chest,” stopping the heart and doing surgery. NeoChord's approach is much less invasive and can be done on a beating heart. A tool is inserted between the ribs and into the heart. Then it is used to attach a chord to the faulty valve leaflet, which is tethered to the heart.

The former CEO Seaburg described the process as “a very elegant treatment."

A Transapical Artificial Chordae Tendinae (TACT) trial is underway to evaluate the NeoChord DS1000. The system now is being used to treat patients in 18 hospitals across eight countries in Europe. More than 120 patients have been treated. It is not yet cleared for commercial use in the U.S.

The market for less invasive techniques for mitral valve repair has been estimated at more than $2 billion. There are 50,000 surgeries done in the U.S. each year. An estimated 2 million patients are treated due to the risks of surgery.

Since it formed in 2007, NeoChord's lifeblood has been venture capital funding. By 2008, it had raised $3 million. It raised another $5.1 million in 2011 to finance the European clinical trial. In March 2013, it raised $3 million through the sale of its series B-2 preferred stock.

June 17, 2014

Brandix i3 'graduates' from Accelerator, leases BioBusiness Center space

Another start-up is "graduating" from the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator to lease office space in Rochester's Minnesota BioBusiness Center.

02272013mayoaccelerator1As a parting gift, it is providing the Accelerator with a short-term solution to its need to expand by  providing space for it to use.

Brandix i3, the healthcare technology arm of a Sri Lanka-based company, has signed a three-year lease with the City of Rochester for 2,000-square-feet of space on the skyway level of the center at  221 First Ave. S.W. The space is half of a 4,000-square-foot area that never hasHeader been built out for a tenant since the BioBusiness Center opened five years ago.

The software development firm plans to have six employees based in the Rochester office to start with, though it expects to grow to 12 by the end of the year, said Aaron Epps, Brandix's associate vice president of healthcare.

"We want to be part of the Destination Medical Center project," said Epps. "We're looking to expand quickly. We're a start-up, but we're a start-up with the backing of a large company."

051509biobusinesscenteratnightBrandix currently is operating out of the Accelerator space. The lease that was approved by the city council Monday sets Brandix's rent at $20 per rentable foot for the 2,000-square-foot space. It also will pay its share toward the maintenance of the building and its taxes.

The city is giving "a one-time fit-up allowance" of $10 per square foot, or $20,000, to the software firm to prepare its offices.

By comparison, the city signed a five-year lease in 2013 with Patient First Home Infusion Services for $16 per square foot and gave it $10,000 to use for construction costs.

In 2013, Imanis Life Sciences signed a five-year lease set at $15.50 per square foot for the first two years.  It then increases every year to $18.50 by the fifth year. The city also agreed to provide Imanis a $20 per foot allowance to build out the space plus an interest-free loan of up to $10,000.

In addition to the leasing the 2,000-square-feet, Brandix's lease promises "first right of refusal" for the other 2,000 square feet of adjacent vacant space to the west.

"In the interim, the Business Accelerator may lease the adjacent space until such time as it is needed by Brandix," according to the lease. There has been talk of expanding the Accelerator, which opened in 2009.

Epps, who has lived his whole life in Rochester, says the company plans to create a "unique" office to enhance the local business community.

Brandix's focus is to work with its local partner, Rochester-based Ambient Clinical Analytics. Ambient makes "real-time decision support tools" for doctors and nurses working in the ICU, operating room or emergency departments.

Mayo Clinic launched Ambient in 2013, and it named Al Berning as CEO. Berning is known in Rochester as a former IBMer, a co-founder of Pemstar and former CEO of Hardcore Computers/LiquidCool Solutions.

May 21, 2014

Mayo launching bioservices firm

Mayo Clinic has long processed and stored patient specimens for its own researchers.

Now it's packaging those services and others together to offer to outside clients via a new start-up company to be called Mayo Clinic Bioservices.

537cd487db2b9.image"Basically, we're taking advantage of some internal business that we've been doing for some time and now we're offering all of that externally to customers," explained Stephen Thibodeau, co-director of the Biorepositories Program in the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine.

This new firm will allow Mayo Clinic to compete in a growing bio industry valued internationally in the billions.

He compared the business model to that used at Mayo Medical Labs, which tests patient sample for hospitals and researchers around the world. Mayo Clinic Biosciences won't run tests, though it will process, store and ship samples for its clients.

In addition to those services, it will also offer access to Mayo Clinic's Biobank. The Biobank features thousands of biological samples, such as blood, from healthy volunteers. Mayo Clinic has been collecting samples for seven years toward reaching a goal of 50,000 samples. Thibodeau estimates that the Biobank will finally reach that goal by June 2015.

The primary base for the new operation is being set up in the warehouse at 2915 Valleyhigh Dr. N.W., which Mayo Clinic bought in 2012. Some freezer units have already been installed and more construction to adapt the facility is underway. Thibodeau estimates that the facility will be ready this summer. Mayo Bioservices is expected to move in by August and have the operation running by September. It will also have satellite locations on Mayo Clinic's Florida and Arizona campuses.

Mayo Clinic currently supports the internal clinic sample processing and storage with a staff of about 70 employees, 50 of which work in Rochester.

"Initially, we expect to have a sufficient amount of staff. Though we do expect the business to grow over time and that we'll need to add more later," he said.

While it's not in operation yet, Mayo Clinic Bioservices has already signed up its first customer.Los Angles-based Sanguine recently signed up to have Mayo Clinic Bioservices process, store and ship biospecimens that Sanguine has collected for clients.

"We are excited about the pilot project with Mayo, not only because it increases the scalability of our business, but also because it allows individuals that have been on our waiting list to participate in the research and development of new treatments," stated Sanguine CEO Brian Neman in the annoucement. "Mayo Clinic Bioservices has tremendous infrastructure and processing capacity that will meet our existing needs while also offering the potential for future expansion."

The agreement between Mayo Clinic and Sanguine is a fee-per-service deal at this point, though they expect the business connection to deepen as time goes on.

"We hope to have a long-term relationship with Sanguine," according to Thibodeau. "Essentially, we're the laboratory arm of Sanguine."

March 03, 2014

Mayo Clinic to expand Superior Drive Support Center

Mayo Clinic is planning to expand its Superior Drive Support Center, which houses Mayo Medical Laboratories.

The clinic submitted plans on Feb. 14 to build a proposed 66,000-square-foot, two-story addition on the south side of the complex at 3050 Superior Drive N.W. 

03032014mayomedlabsMML conducts a wide variety of medical tests for hospitals worldwide. According to its website,
it performs nearly 20 million tests for more than 4,000 hospitals annually. The testing division overall has more than 3,200 employees, including more than 160 physicians and scientists. It has 58 laboratories that perform testing with support from Mayo Clinic physicians.

03032014SDSCplansWhile Mayo Clinic spokesperson confirmed the existence of site development application, officials there say it's too early to discuss specifics such as the timeline for the project or estimated cost. However, the plans designed by Flad Architects offer general details.

The expansion will more than double the lab space in the complex. It currently has 30,854 square feet of labs. The plans show that 34,000 square feet of laboratory area in the proposed addition to bring the total lab space to a total of 65,000 square feet.

Office space in the SDSC is slated to grow by 5,472 square feet, for a total of 137,000 square feet of space, following the expansion.

The remainder of the 26,000 square feet in the proposed expansion is described only as "Other." The first floor of the addition will have 28,533 square feet, and the second level will have 27,842.

Mayo Clinic moved into the 13-year-old complex in 2004. By 2011, approximately 800 employees worked at the facility. It was originally built by electronics manufacturer Celestica Inc. in 2001. When that company closed its Rochester operation, the building was left empty.

While Mayo Clinic leased the property for eight years, it purchased it for $18.5 million in August of 2012. Prior to that it was owned by 17 national investors through Triple Net Properties of Santa Ana, Calif. until they defaulted on the mortgage in 2012.  The investors bought the property for $36.8 million in 2006

When the mortgage defaulted, HSBC Bank USA took over the property. HSCB then sold it to Mayo Clinic.

While it was was originally under construction, New York City-based W. P. Carey & Co. LLC bought the complex from Celestica, which leased it back. W.P. Carey later sold it for about 70 percent more than the $21.6 million it paid for it.

December 05, 2013

Breast cancer scanner maker, once linked to Mayo Clinic, sold to Mexican company

Qg3q4q112233Here's a potentially interesting nugget of news about San Diego-based Naviscan Inc., which was at one pointed linked with Mayo Clinic through intellectual property licenses as well as direct investment by Mayo Medical Ventures.

"… Certain Naviscan Inc. assets including intellectual property and the Naviscan Trademark" have been aquired by a Mexican medical scanner company called Compañía Mexicana de Radiología or CMR.

Not sure what that means exactly, but my guess is that CMR is now behind the steering wheel at Naviscan.

Now I don't know if Mayo Clinic still has any links with Naviscan, but it certainly did at one time. I've got calls into Mayo and Naviscan to check on that.

I wrote the Mayo Clinic-Naviscan relationship back in 2005 through 2007 or so. Sheesh, I've been doing this for a long time.

From back in November 2005:

Naviscan “entered into an agreement with Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (Mayo Clinic) to clinically validate and commercialize a dynamic patented molecular imaging agent for use with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and other imaging modalities. … Mayo Clinic has licensed the vitamin B-12 molecular imaging agent technology invented by Dr. Douglas A.Collins to Naviscan PET Systems, Inc and will receive royalties from this license. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have published studies that cancers have high uptake of radioactive B-12, especially in breast tumors."

    --------------------
"The combination of the Mayo Clinic’s patented Vitamin B-12 molecular imaging agent and Naviscan’s high-resolution PET scanner holds great promise for the future in terms of early detection of breast cancers,” said Paul Grayson, newly-appointed CEO of Naviscan PET Systems, Inc. and a Managing Director of Sanderling Ventures. “We sought out Naviscan’s technology to strategically invest in this important imaging technology platform.” Naviscan is planning clinical trial work with Mayo Clinic and other luminary sites in the U.S. to prove the value of the PEM Flex in breast cancer patients, as well as for evaluating PEM’s role with high-risk patients.”

----

From the same date in 2005:

“Naviscan PET Systems has raised a $6.5 million in Series B funding for its high resolution positron emission tomography (PET) products. The firm said that it raised the round from Sanderling Ventures, with participation from Mayo Medical Ventures."

FYI, Sanderling Ventures now leases a space in the Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator.

November 26, 2013

Mayo Clinic-linked Cardio3 part of Europe group awarded $6M research grant

C3bs_logoCardio3 BioSciences, the biotechnology firm based on Mayo Clinic research, is part of a European research consortium that recently snagged a four-year research grant for $4.5 million euros or $6 million U.S. dollars to develop "a bioresorbable polymeric valve tube for the treatment of patient suffering congenital heart defects." 

Cardio3 licensed Mayo Clinic's research back in 2007. That research is led by Mayo Clinic's Dr. Andre Terzic and Dr. Atta Behfar. The therapy uses stem cells from a patient's  bone marrow. Through a proprietary process called Cardiopoiesis, Cardio3 re-programs those cells to become heart cells. The cells are then injected back into the patient's heart to repair damaged tissue.
 
Here's some from the announcement of this latest project:

Cardio3 BioSciences…  is part of a consortium which has been awarded a highly competitive European Union Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (FP7) research grant from the European Union to support the development of a bioresorbable polymeric valve tube for the treatment of patient suffering congenital heart defects.

The project, titled "Tissue engineering of the right heart outflow tract by biofunctionalized bioresorbable polymeric valved tube", or "TEH-TUBE", is a four year project and will start on 1st January 2014.

Dorv4C3BS is part of a first-in-class, pan-European consortium composed of seven companies and universities, led by the "Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris (APHP)" and the team of Professor David Kalfa and Philippe Menasché.

-----

C3BS is the exploitation manager of the consortium and as such is in charge of exploiting the outcome of the research project. Within the consortium, Cardio3 is also in charge of the production of the mesenchymal stem cells and the definition and the implementation of the regulatory strategy.

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"We are delighted to be part of a project which represents a potential paradigm shift in the treatment of congenital cardiac diseases," said Dr. Christian Homsy, CEO of Cardio3 BioSciences. "We are also honored to be chosen by our partners to exploit the outcome of this program. It demonstrates the confidence and the recognition of our peers in the expertise we have built over the past years. FP7 grants are awarded on the basis of a highly competitive, two-stage, peer-review process, therefore this award serves as recognition of our cell production, regulatory and clinical expertise."


This wraps up a big year for Cardio3 BioSciences. It released an IPO in July on NYSE Euronext stock exchanges in Brussels and Paris that raised $29.6 million, or 23 million Euros.

November 15, 2013

Mayo Clinic to be at center of LifeScience Alley conference

This is kind of interesting. LifeScience Alley, Minnesota's medical device and bioscience industry group, is hosting its 2013 conference in Minneapolis next week.

And Mayo Clinic will be the centerpiece. If I register by midnight, it will only cost me $495 to attend. If I don't hit the button by midnight, it'll cost me $750.

Hhhhmm.... I think I'll stay in Rochester and confer with inside sources here. Maybe with the bosses gone, folks will feel more chatty than usual. Heh.

Here's some from the conference pitch:

On Wednesday, at the LifeScience Alley 2013 Conference in Minneapolis, leaders from world-class life science and healthcare organizations will discuss how changes in healthcare policy and delivery are rewriting the way our community innovates, operates and delivers value to patients.  

New-Technology-Showcase-Logo-2012-ConfOne of these organizations is this year's New Technology Showcase Partner, Mayo Clinic.  As a global leader in healthcare innovation and delivery, Mayo Clinic will be introducing several cutting-edge life science technologies, two of which originate from research conducted at Mayo.   

During the Morning Keynote, "Controlling Costs in the New Healthcare Environment - Effectively Managing the Global Supply Chain", Mayo Clinic's Karen Wolfe will highlight how the organization manages logistics and its global supply chain to minimize healthcare costs while delivering more value to its patients.   

In addition, representatives from Mayo Clinic Ventures, Mayo Clinic Research and Destination Medical Center (DMC) will be at their booths to discuss all that Mayo Clinic and the city of Rochester have to offer life science companies and entrepreneurs.

November 14, 2013

Rochester Medical shareholders OK acquisition

Rochester Medical Corp., Stewartville's largest employer, became a  subsidiary of New Jersey-based C.R. Bard at 8 a.m. today following Wednesday's overwhelmingly positive shareholder vote.

Votes representing 8.4 million shares were counted in a Minneapolis board room of the law firm Dorsey & Whitney. The $262 million deal was approved by a vote of 8.1 million in favor to 179,156 against. Another 12,054 abstained. Rochester Medical had 12.3 million outstanding shares that were eligible to vote.

Rochester Medical's Chief Financial Officer David Jonas said the vote tally took about 30 minutes. About 20 people attended the voted.

Shares of Rochester Medical were trading at $20 at the close of the market on Wednesday.

Representatives of C.R. Bard are scheduled to discuss their future plans at an all-employee meeting Friday morning at the catheter manufacturing facility. Rochester Medical has about 250 employees in Stewartville with a total of 400 worldwide.

While no specifics have been discussed about what will happen to the Stewartville facility or its employees, the president of Bard’s Medical Division made encouraging comments to staff in September.

"We are making this merger because we really believe you have got a ton to bring to us. These are additive, these two companies. There is not a ton of overlap," said Peter Curry, according to documents filed with the  U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

This acquisition marks the end of the local ownership of the 25-year-old company co-founded and run by CEO Anthony Conway and his brother, Vice President Philip Conway. The CEO has previously said that he and his brother will remain "deeply involved in the transition … ensuring that our new products will get to market in a very timely fashion."

November 11, 2013

Mayo Clinic, U of M startup ready for software rollout

Rochester's Evidentia Health got some press last week about its impending rollout at Fairview Health Systems.

Evidentia Health was one of the first tenants of Mayo Clinic Business Accelerator when it opened early this year.

Its billed as a health care IT company with licensed expe02272013mayoaccelerator1rtise and medical content from both Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota

It was co-founded by Mayo Clinic's Dr. Jeremy Friese in early 2012.Friese, an interventional radiologist, is the medical director for new ventures and business development in the Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine.

Evidentia was profiled on Wednesday by TechdotMN, a non-profit business media group. Here's some from that piece by Yael Grauer:

As new provisions from the Affordable Healthcare Act take effect, Minnesota startup Evidentia Health is poised to help patients better understand their electronic health records (EHRs) while helping physicians meet criteria for “meaningful use” of EHR technology to improve patient care.

To receive EHR incentive pay under Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, healthcare providers must show they are meaningfully using EHRs by meeting various objectives.  Patients are required to be able to access their medical information within three days of when it’s created, and in 2014, this will be within one day.

The problem is that viewing EHR material and doing research online can be confusing to patients. They can jump to the wrong conclusions, worry unnecessarily and often have questions for their care team that may not be applicable.

Evidentia provides reports to both patients and physicians. The reports for patients include the most important sources of information, as well as secondary information for those interested in even more. In addition to the material in patient reports, physicians also receive recent medical research for evidence-based medicine studies.

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Founded in October 2012, Evidentia is funded by Mayo Clinic Ventures and the University of Minnesota. A pilot program is taking place at the Family Practice Internal Medicine groups in Rochester, and Evidentia is prepared to deploy within Fairview at University Hospital.

As new provisions from the Affordable Healthcare Act take effect, Minnesota startup Evidentia Health is poised to help patients better understand their electronic health records (EHRs) while helping physicians meet criteria for “meaningful use” of EHR technology to improve patient care.

To receive EHR incentive pay under Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, healthcare providers must show they are meaningfully using EHRs by meeting various objectives.  Patients are required to be able to access their medical information within three days of when it’s created, and in 2014, this will be within one day.

The problem is that viewing EHR material and doing research online can be confusing to patients. They can jump to the wrong conclusions, worry unnecessarily and often have questions for their care team that may not be applicable.

Evidentia provides reports to both patients and physicians. The reports for patients include the most important sources of information, as well as secondary information for those interested in even more. In addition to the material in patient reports, physicians also receive recent medical research for evidence-based medicine studies.

“Evidentia brings together all of the information that you need to know and get it in your hands in a way that’s both credible and trustworthy, has been reviewed by physicians, and is applicable to your situation,” says CTO Brent Backhaus.

When patients access their electronic medical records, they’ve often confused about certain key phrases or conditions. Evidentia looks at the text of the reports, highlights key phrases, and presents individualized information to the patient. The information selected is both algorithmically selected and reviewed by a physician.

“We pick information to present to both to the patient and the physician that make the most sense for them to see at that point in time about their specific condition,” Backhaus says.

In addition to Backhaus, who was the founding CTO of Virtual Radiologic, Evidentia’s team includes CEO Jeremy Friese, a Harvard MBA and Associate Chair of Radiology at Mayo Clinic, and chief product officer Dan Steinberger, a U of M physician and technology leader, and founder of ProVation Medical (which had a $100m exit in 2006).

Founded in October 2012, Evidentia is funded by Mayo Clinic Ventures and the University of Minnesota. A pilot program is taking place at the Family Practice Internal Medicine groups in Rochester, and Evidentia is prepared to deploy within Fairview at University Hospital.

- See more at: http://tech.mn/news/2013/11/06/evidentia-health-mayo-clinic-ventures/#sthash.tL8tSBOX.dpuf
Yael Grauer
Yael Grauer
Yael Grauer
Yael Grauer

As new provisions from the Affordable Healthcare Act take effect, Minnesota startup Evidentia Health is poised to help patients better understand their electronic health records (EHRs) while helping physicians meet criteria for “meaningful use” of EHR technology to improve patient care.

To receive EHR incentive pay under Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs, healthcare providers must show they are meaningfully using EHRs by meeting various objectives.  Patients are required to be able to access their medical information within three days of when it’s created, and in 2014, this will be within one day.

The problem is that viewing EHR material and doing research online can be confusing to patients. They can jump to the wrong conclusions, worry unnecessarily and often have questions for their care team that may not be applicable.

Evidentia provides reports to both patients and physicians. The reports for patients include the most important sources of information, as well as secondary information for those interested in even more. In addition to the material in patient reports, physicians also receive recent medical research for evidence-based medicine studies.

“Evidentia brings together all of the information that you need to know and get it in your hands in a way that’s both credible and trustworthy, has been reviewed by physicians, and is applicable to your situation,” says CTO Brent Backhaus.

When patients access their electronic medical records, they’ve often confused about certain key phrases or conditions. Evidentia looks at the text of the reports, highlights key phrases, and presents individualized information to the patient. The information selected is both algorithmically selected and reviewed by a physician.

“We pick information to present to both to the patient and the physician that make the most sense for them to see at that point in time about their specific condition,” Backhaus says.

In addition to Backhaus, who was the founding CTO of Virtual Radiologic, Evidentia’s team includes CEO Jeremy Friese, a Harvard MBA and Associate Chair of Radiology at Mayo Clinic, and chief product officer Dan Steinberger, a U of M physician and technology leader, and founder of ProVation Medical (which had a $100m exit in 2006).

Founded in October 2012, Evidentia is funded by Mayo Clinic Ventures and the University of Minnesota. A pilot program is taking place at the Family Practice Internal Medicine groups in Rochester, and Evidentia is prepared to deploy within Fairview at University Hospital.

- See more at: http://tech.mn/news/2013/11/06/evidentia-health-mayo-clinic-ventures/#sthash.tL8tSBOX.dpufis it will roll out its technology this year.