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21 posts categorized "architect news"

October 10, 2014

Kane and Johnson Architects merges with WSN

Kane and Johnson Architects, a small firm with a 63-year history in Rochester and Austin, is joining forces with a larger Minnesota company.

The five-person office merged Oct. 1 with Crookston-based Widseth Smith Nolting, an engineering and planning company. The Kane and Johnson team has joined WSN's Rochester office at 6301 Bandel Road N.W.

"I selected the firm I most respect and feel will best serve my clients," said David Kane about the "evolution" of the business that his father Warren Kane founded in 1951 in Austin. "They have a very similar culture, which makes this a comfortable change."FrmReadMail_Attachment-1

WSN has been in discussions with Kane and Johnson about merging, since March.

The two firms have competed for as well as worked together on many Minnesota and Iowa projects over the years. Recently, they've been working on what they describe as "their signature collaboration," the seven-story Bridge Plaza in Mankato. Work is expected to start on that mixed-use complex in 2015.

WSN has seven offices and 195 employees in Minnesota and North Dakota. It has always specialized in working in the smaller, non-metro communities since it was founded in 1975, said Joe Breiter, WSN's director of business developmenFrmReadMail_Attachment-3t. It has long working relationships with companies like Brainerd-based Mills Fleet Farm and Bremer Bank.

“WSN recognizes Rochester as a market that continues to experience significant growth. Bringing in KJA adds dimension to our experience and deepens our capacity to serve both firms’ existing and prospective clients,” stated WSN president Kevin Donnay in the announcement of the merger.

The Crookston firm has been interested in Rochester for some time. It merged with QED Engineering, a 20-year-old Rochester firm, in 2009. Since then, its Med City office has grown steadily to a staff of about 20 with the addition of Kane and Johnson.

FrmReadMail_Attachment-2"Rochester is the largest community where we have an office. We're seeing a lot growth here," said Brian Carlson, who joined WSN's local office earlier this year. He added that WSN has many "significant" projects in the pipeline for the area.

Kane, who will remain on with WSN, said this deal made excellent sense as the next step for his evolving business that has adapted many times over the years.

He has led the firm since he was 24. Kane started working there in 1974 and then was forced to lead the business a year later when his father suddenly died. He expanded the practice into Rochester in 1988 by acquiring Pieper Richmond Architects. In 1993, Kane sold the Austin practice in 1993 to his partner.

Over the years, Kane's small firm has lead the way in many areas. It was one of the first firms to begin offering asbestos removal in Minnesota and handled many large abatement projects throughout the Midwest. It was also an early innovator in the area of handicapped accessibility dating back to 1976, well before the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The firm has worked on such high profile projects, such as Olmsted National Banks' headquarters at 975 34th Ave. N.W., Timothy Chapel at Rochester's Autumn Ridge Church, the Steele County History Center and renovation of the Winona County Courthouse.

"Now with the additional resources of WSN, we'll be able to do even more," said Kane. "The financial reality is that it's tough to compete as a small, private practice."

October 07, 2014

OMC expanding its administration offices on Third Avenue

Olmsted Medical Center is expanding its footprint in a Third Avenue office building to house much of its administration staff.

Since 2013, OMC has been leasing 4,200 square feet of office space in the SEH-Yaggy building at 717 Third Ave. S.E., which is near its Southeast Clinic. About 20 senior administrators are based there, said Jeremy Salucka, OMC's communications coordinator.

SEH YaggyNow OMC has launched a construction project to expand its presence within that complex to about 15,000 square feet of office space.

"We're more than tripling the space we have there," said Salucka.

The plan is to eventually move administration staffers currently working in other leased offices into the Third Avenue building to consolidate many of OMC's non-clinical departments, he said. It will  also create much needed conference room space.

"This will help us reduce overhead and bring teams together under one roof," he said.

The exact number of workers that will join the 20 already in the building has not been determined yet. It could possibly double up to 40 people, according to rough ballpark estimate by Salucka.

The project is expected to be completed sometime in January.

CRW Architecture-Design Group moved its team of 10 people out of the building at the end of September. The firm had been based in there, since it spun off from what was previously known as Yaggy-Colby Associates in 2010.

CRW has a new office building plus four apartments under construction at 11th Avenue and Second St. N.W. It is hoped to be completed yet this fall.

August 20, 2014

Rochester architecture firm to move soon

A Rochester architecture firm soon will move out of its long-time digs.

CRW Architecture-Design Group, formerly part of Yaggy Colby Associates, will move out of its offices at 717 Third Ave. S.E. at the end of September, said CRW Principal Chris Colby. The firm has been based in the SEH-Yaggy complex, since it spun off from Yaggy-Colby in 2010.
08202014crwoffices
CRW is led by Colby, Jose Rivas and Jason Woodhouse. All three previously worked for what used to be Yaggy Colby.

SEH-Yaggy has committed that office space to another tenant, according to Colby. SEH-Yaggy is the result of a merger earlier this year between Yaggy-Colby and St. Paul-based Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc.

CRW OfficeWhile the firm eventually will move into its own building, construction of its 4,200-square-foot offices plus four apartments isn't expected to be completed until late October or early November.

That means the 10 employees at CRW will need to temporarily find work space for the 45 to 60 days until its new offices are finished, said Colby.

CRW's new complex is being built at 11th Avenue and Second St. N.W. The office and apartments are being developed by Jose Rivas.

June 30, 2014

Consultants hired to create DMC blueprint w/ FULL CONTRACTS

Here's some of the lead-in to my package from the weekend about the $4.1 million  contracts for the consultants to create the Destination Medical Center plan to re-make Rochester.

There's a lot more detail in the rest of the package. So if you are interested in this topic, I'd suggest reading the full piece.

And for the document wonks out there like me, here's the 251 page PDF that includes all of the contracts with Nelson / Nygaard Consulting Associates of San Francisco; Kimley-Horn and Associates of Cary, N.C.; AECOM Technical Services of Los Angeles; and EE&K of New York.

Download Combined Consulting Agreements EDA(1)

 

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Planning for a complex initiative like Mayo Clinic's Destination Medical Center doesn't come cheaply.

The surge of DMC hype already has national and international businesses fluttering around Rochester's sudden glow. The sale of commercial real estate is booming, particularly in the downtown core. New housing developments are being mapped out for the tens of thousands of people expected to move to Rochester for the forecasted 35,000 to 45,000 new jobs.

51687d3f5e0c6-image However, there's no blueprint yet for the $6 billion upgrade of the city's infrastructure, transportation systems, private development and more that's at the heart of DMC's vision of a Rochester better suited to accommodate more patients for Mayo Clinic.

Hiring a team to create a detailed plan for the massive undertaking to change the face of the city was a top priority for the public Destination Medical Center Corp. board of directors.

Public-private projects on this scale are rare in U.S., so there are not many examples to follow. National experts say sports developments, like the $975 million Vikings stadium and the new $622 million Atlanta Braves stadium, are about the only comparable projects to what is being proposed in Rochester.

The DMCC contracted with the DMC private Economic Development Agency, led by Mayo Clinic's Lisa Clarke, to handle hiring consultants to create the overall DMC "development plan." In December, the EDA board posted requests for proposal for six roles in the planning process.

800px-Gonda_building,_closer_upWith so much money on the table, proposals came in from 19 leading firms across the country and even overseas. Five of the teams vying for the contracts are based in Minnesota with three of them having offices in Rochester.

In April, the EDA wrapped up that six-month hiring process by contracting with four national consulting firms. Two were chosen to fill dual roles.

All of the consultants have had experience in major public-private projects, from stadiums to transit systems to airports.

Those four, plus another company hired in February, will be paid a total of $4.1 million this year to create the DMC's grand plan by February. That $4.1 million accounts for almost half of the DMC's total city-funded budget of $8.2 million for 2014.

In the end, all of the Minnesota hopefuls were passed over for the DMC planning jobs.

"The main factors that influenced our decisions was experience, knowledge of the market and the team they put forward. Those were the basic components we needed to consider as we moved forward," said Clarke. "I'm very confident that we have hired the best."

June 27, 2014

Mayo Clinic still mum on SE Rochester building

There's no question that an unmarked 22,000-square-foot commercial center is being built in south Rochester's Shoppes on Maine area.

The question is what will it be used for when completed?

The half-completed gray and blue building at 4544 Canal Place S.E. stands at the corner of Canal Place and Maine Avenue Southeast.

06262014mayoclinicsoutheastIt's described as "Future Mayo Clinic Southeast" in city building permits dating back to April. However, Mayo Clinic isn't acknowledging any involvement.

"We don’t have anything to share at this time. When we do — I’ll certainly let you know" is how Rebecca F. Eisenman of Mayo Clinic Communications responded to questions on June 18.

In April, Eisenman did acknowledge that Mayo Clinic is interested in the area.

"We are exploring options to improve our ability to improve access to community care for our employees and those who depend on us for these services," she wrote. "Future options may include expansion of facilities and services in southeast Minnesota, but no specific details are available at this time."

The owner of the project is Canal Place Pointe Inc., which is based nearby at Suite 200 of 4325 Maine Avenue. That's also the address of the office of Maine Street Development Co. Tom Hexum, who manages the Maine Street Development projects with partner Ron Schultz from that office, filed the original land development application for the building. He says it's owned by a group of local investors, though he is not part of that group.

Hexum describes the building as a Mayo Clinic project.

Building permits show that just the structural shell of the Canal Place Pointe complex is valued at $1.4 million. There is a half-circle drive under an 880-square-foot canopy in front that would be handy for a medical facility. The parking lot features 109 parking spaces.

The whole facility, being built by Benike Construction, is on two acres of land. The local design firm SEH-Yaggy, formerly known as Yaggy Colby Associates, planned the project.

March 03, 2014

Mayo Clinic to expand Superior Drive Support Center

Mayo Clinic is planning to expand its Superior Drive Support Center, which houses Mayo Medical Laboratories.

The clinic submitted plans on Feb. 14 to build a proposed 66,000-square-foot, two-story addition on the south side of the complex at 3050 Superior Drive N.W. 

03032014mayomedlabsMML conducts a wide variety of medical tests for hospitals worldwide. According to its website,
it performs nearly 20 million tests for more than 4,000 hospitals annually. The testing division overall has more than 3,200 employees, including more than 160 physicians and scientists. It has 58 laboratories that perform testing with support from Mayo Clinic physicians.

03032014SDSCplansWhile Mayo Clinic spokesperson confirmed the existence of site development application, officials there say it's too early to discuss specifics such as the timeline for the project or estimated cost. However, the plans designed by Flad Architects offer general details.

The expansion will more than double the lab space in the complex. It currently has 30,854 square feet of labs. The plans show that 34,000 square feet of laboratory area in the proposed addition to bring the total lab space to a total of 65,000 square feet.

Office space in the SDSC is slated to grow by 5,472 square feet, for a total of 137,000 square feet of space, following the expansion.

The remainder of the 26,000 square feet in the proposed expansion is described only as "Other." The first floor of the addition will have 28,533 square feet, and the second level will have 27,842.

Mayo Clinic moved into the 13-year-old complex in 2004. By 2011, approximately 800 employees worked at the facility. It was originally built by electronics manufacturer Celestica Inc. in 2001. When that company closed its Rochester operation, the building was left empty.

While Mayo Clinic leased the property for eight years, it purchased it for $18.5 million in August of 2012. Prior to that it was owned by 17 national investors through Triple Net Properties of Santa Ana, Calif. until they defaulted on the mortgage in 2012.  The investors bought the property for $36.8 million in 2006

When the mortgage defaulted, HSBC Bank USA took over the property. HSCB then sold it to Mayo Clinic.

While it was was originally under construction, New York City-based W. P. Carey & Co. LLC bought the complex from Celestica, which leased it back. W.P. Carey later sold it for about 70 percent more than the $21.6 million it paid for it.

February 10, 2014

City Centre plans take shape

Titan Development and Investments officials, led by father-and-son developers Gus and Andy Chafoulias, have finalized plans for a six-story commercial complex with a roof-top lounge on top to be built in downtown Rochester.

CitycentresiteWhen buzz about the project began in May, it was described by Andy Chafoulias as a four-story building. However, Mayo Clinic's Destination Medical Center initiative plus news that the tenants in the nearby seven-story Associated Bank Building are being displaced spurred the developers to change their plans.

The project, now called City Centre One, was earmarked by the Rochester City Council in September to be included in the $2 billion in private investment promised to the state as part of DMC.

A special redevelopment tax-increment-financing district was approved by the city to raise $300,000 to cover the asbestos removal and demolition of the former C.O. Brown building at 300 S. Broadway. Once the prep work is complete, the site will be ready for demolition crews to clear away the old building to make way for the City Centre One.

Titan submitted a development plan to the city last week, which is the first detailed description of the complex since it was first announced.

Plans by Rochester's CRW Architecture + Design Group show a 34,371-square-foot, seven-story complex.

The street level of the building is expected to feature an Italian restaurant, created and run by restaurateurs Pat Woodring and Scott Foster. Woodring and Foster are the minds behind Chester's Kitchen & Bar and Pescara. That floor will be the largest at 5,144 square feet in size.

The second through sixth floors are all expected to house commercial office tenants similar those that now lease space in the Associated Bank Building. Each of those floors are slated to be 5,121 square feet in size.

Topping the structure is a 3,622-square-foot rooftop lounge, which also will be a creation  of Woodring and Foster.

November 11, 2013

Former Home Design Studio complex sold for $1.3 million

An empty 32,000-square-foot former home construction showroom in northwest Rochester recently sold for $1.3 million.HDS

Event Studio LLC of Rochester bought the uniquely designed Home Design Studio complex from Partnership 10 of Byron. It's located at 3777 40th Ave. N.W. along West Circle Drive.

No individual names were listed on the Olmsted County sales record. However, Event Studio receives its tax bills at 123 Carlton St. S.W., which is also the headquarters of Elcor Construction. Elcor is owned by local developer and real estate investor Dan Penz.

Penz couldn't be reached for comment on any possible involvement. HDSic

Partnership 10, which lists Jerome Bigelow and Randy Lennon as principals on state incorporation documents, originally purchased the empty land for $425,000 in 2005. Home Design Studio was built and opened in 2006, not long before the home building market plummeted.

That was also the same time period that Rochester Market Square, another home construction mall, also opened in south Rochester. That facility recently was re-configured and re-opened as Rochester Public School's Alternative Learning Center.

When Home Design Studio opened in 2006, it had 13 local owners and 59 people on staff.

The final occupants – Home Improvement Professionals, the Olmsted County Lumber Mart and Home Design Studio Flooring and Cabinets – moved to Byron in April 2012. OCLM was recently sold and closed, though the other businesses remain active.

October 22, 2012

A clinic in Rochester a dream come true for dentist

Had this one last week. Just learned that Rochester's CRW Architecture + Design Group is handling this project.

The plan for the facility includes space for 4 treatment rooms, 2 hygiene rooms, an x-ray area and related staff and support areas, according to CRW's Facebook page. CRW also says that this project is on a fast track schedule intended to be open for business by January 2013.

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Dr. Karen Buttar is all smiles as she talks about her new dental clinic being built in the Med City's fastest growing commercial area.

"I've always dreamed of this. It was time to step up," she says. "Here, I'll be able to do all I ever dreamed of."

The almost 3,000-square-foot Dental Care Clinic is under construction along 19th Street Northwest next to the Highlands Business Park. Buttar hopes it will be completed in December, so she can open before the start of 2013.

68371_479447068752950_765566309_n-1The clinic is directly across the road from the new facility being built for Paws & Claws next to the Rochester Athletic Club. The dental clinic is going up on the spot originally pegged for Paws & Claws before it migrated across 19th Street.

Buttar, who has practiced dentistry in Rochester for years, most recently leased space in the Minnesota Lakes Dental Clinic in the Shoppes on Maine development.

Her plan is to offer a full range of general dentistry services with some extra emphasis on cosmetic services and care for children.

"I love to treat kids," she says.

Having her own clinic will give Buttar the flexibility to take extra time with each patient.

"There will be no rushing. I like to have a relationship with each patient," she says.

In addition to having more control over her time, the new clinic will allow Buttar to take advantage of the latest technology. For example, she is outfitting it with an X-ray imaging machine that uses 90 percent less radiation than traditional ones.

Why did she decide to build along 19th Street Northwest?

The new CostCo store, Kwik Trip station and Lourdes High School all being built nearby signal the explosive growth in that part of Rochester, Buttar points out. She also likes being near the Rochester Athletic Club.

"And it is much more centrally located than I have been in the past," she says.

Buttar expects to have three or four people on staff when she opens up the clinic.

In the end, she said the whole project is about the patients. She remembers how overwhelmed with emotion one woman was after Buttar closed up the spacing between her teeth with less than two hours of treatment.

"At the end of the day, you feel like you did something worthwhile," she says. "I love it."

September 18, 2012

Mayo, Roch. and RAEDI join forces to speed biz growth

Here's some from my story about a new project at the Minnesota BioBusiness Building:
To help launch fledgling companies, Mayo Clinic, the city of Rochester and Rochester Area Economic Development Inc. are creating a new "accelerator center."

The Rochester City Council gave the green light Monday night to move ahead with a proposal to create 2,500 square feet of office space on the second floor of the Minnesota Biobusiness Center in downtown Rochester.
6a00d83451cc8269e20115721b3098970b-250wi
Mayo Clinic is giving $100,000 to turn the unused space, which is owned by the city, into offices. RAEDI will handle the management and leasing of the space.

"It is a great collaboration," says Jim Rogers, chair of the Mayo Clinic Ventures, which manages the clinic's intellectual property and patents. "It is something we are very excited about."

Mayo Clinic leases the top five floors of the eight-story building for a variety of offices, including Mayo Clinic Ventures. That leaves the bottom three levels for outside tenants. When it opened in 2009, the goal was to attract biotechnology and medical device firms that would benefit by being near Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota Rochester.

The downswing of the recession stalled the growth of that type of biobusiness, so the city began reaching out to other types of tenants, such as Think Mutual Savings Bank, College of St. Scholastica and Hirman Insurers.

This new approach is aimed at sparking more action in the biotech sector by the focusing on early stage start-ups that just need "a place to hang their hats," says Doug Knott, the city's development director.

About 86 percent of the building is now under lease, he says. The accelerator will bring that percentage close to 90 percent.

"Using a relatively small space for this could potentially bring a big pay-off," says Knott.

Plans for the accelerator center are still being finalized, but it is expected it will include about six offices plus a conference room and other public areas. HGA, which was the architect firm for the building, is working on designs for this space. Rents are expected to range from $13 to $15 per square foot.

"The intent is to accelerate the growth of these businesses," says Knott. "And then move them to other parts of the building or elsewhere in the center, when they outgrow it."

The ultimate goal is to take advantage of the influence of Mayo Clinic's efforts to spin off related businesses and generate more local jobs.

"We hope to have it ready to open by the first of the year," says Gary Smith, RAEDI president.