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June 19, 2012

Big Blue tops world's fastest computer list with Roch. systems

Here's a little from my two lengthy stories in today's paper about IBM's rocket ride back to the top of the world's fastest super computer list and Rochester fueled it.

This is mainly focused on the Blue Gene/Q systems. I have more focusing on the new warm-water cooled SuperMUC system in another piece in print.

Ibm_sequoia_llnlAfter a few years in the middle of the supercomputing pack, Big Blue rocketed to the top spot by running a world record-breaking speed of 16.3 petaflops and capturing five of the top 10 rankings in the latest international list of top supercomputers.

And Rochester is in the driver's seat for this IBM resurgence.

"It's the Academy Awards of what we do. This is the thing you go after," says Andy Schram, the proud project executive for Blue Gene supercomputers in Rochester. "But it's not a beauty contest. You actually have to perform. They have to deliver value to the client."

The Rochester-made Blue Gene family of machines and the new water-cooled SuperMUC machine certainly delivered.

IBM-SuperMUC-cropped-proto-custom_28When the twice-annual Top 500 supercomputer list was unveiled Monday, IBM's Sequoia Blue Gene/Q machine roared into the top spot, past Fujitsu’s K Computer, which had held that ranking on the last two lists in November and June 2011.

Mira, another Blue Gene/Q, took third place with 8.1 petaflops. Two other Blue Gene/Qs were at Nos. 7 and 8; while the SuperMUC system was No. 4.

In all, 15 Blue Gene/Qs were ranked in the top 100. They were all designed, manufactured and tested by several hundred staffers in Rochester. 

 

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finally we have proof, I have always believed that computers were just flashing lights with real people inside working with pencils.

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