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October 29, 2009

NeoChord's first human patient

Remember NeoChord?

That's the Minneapolis biotech company founded in 2007 that is working on bringing to market a Mayo Clinic-created non-invasive method for fixing a leaky heart valve AKA mitral-valve regurgitation.

Neo1 Mayo Clinic does have an investment in an equity position in NeoChord

Well, it has installed its heart fix in a human patient in Europe now.

That sounds like a solid step toward getting a product to market, assuming the test goes well.

Here's some from a press release on the study:

NeoChord, Inc., a venture-backed, Minneapolis-based medical technology company, announced today that it has enrolled the first patient in its European clinical trial.

The trial is being conducted in Germany, Denmark, Czech Republic and Norway.

“We are very pleased with the early results of this first procedure,” said Per Wierup and Sten Lyager Nielsen, the cardiac surgeons who performed the surgery. “The patient is an otherwise healthy, very active 47-year-old male who preferred to not have a sternotomy or cardiopulmonary bypass to fix his severe mitral regurgitation. The NeoChord approach has successfully treated his mitral regurgitation and potentially offers him a quick return to his military career and favorite hobby, scuba diving.”

Intra-operative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) confirmed that the patient’s severe, eccentric mitral regurgitation was reduced to zero or trace mitral regurgitation. 

Giovanni Speziali, MD, the cardiac surgeon who is the primary inventor of the NeoChord device also attended the procedure.  “These results, although early, are equivalent to what we obtain in traditional open heart surgery for correction of mitral regurgitation,” said Dr. Speziali.

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