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22 December 2015

Comments

Jay Furst

Hi -- here's the full policy that Kevin was shown that night and which the library just provided to me...not sure why you'd omit the second sentence in your comment above:

From http://www.rochesterpubliclibrary.org/my-rpl/about-us/code-of-conduct :
PHOTOGRAPHY: Filming and photography is allowed if it does not interfere with the delivery of library services. Persons filming or taking photographs on library premises are responsible for gaining all necessary permissions to use the photos.

Now, personally, I was surprised by this policy as well, since the library tapes these every month. That said, it's the policy, the library was taping it and Kevin was borderline rude and arrogant about his right to do as he pleased.

And regarding the "pesky First Amendment," every public building has its own policies, it wasn't a government meeting and again -- frankly? -- this kind of thing would only come up at a meeting on gun rights. It's never come up before in the 10 years we've been doing these meetings, on any other political topic.

Bryan Strawser

Hi -

We researched this PRIOR to the event. The library's policy, as posted on their website, allows photography and videography as long as it does not interfere with the delivery of library services.

See: http://www.rochesterpubliclibrary.org/my-rpl/about-us/code-of-conduct

In particular:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Filming and photography is allowed if it does not interfere with the delivery of library services.

Kevin was correct to challenge the fact that he was being asked to not film given the library's stated policy on their website.

This was a public meeting, with public officials, in a building owned by the public. I have a hard time understanding why videotaping the event was even of concern to anyone.

Bryan Strawser
Executive Director
Minnesota Gun Owners Caucus / Political Action Committee

Robdoar

You do understand that preventing a citizen from documenting a public form on public property is a violation of rights, right?

It's that same pesky first amendment that allows your paper to be published, even though government officials may not like the content.

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